Amanda Glassman

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Amanda L. Glassman[1] is the vice president for programs, the director of global health policy, and a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development, a US nonprofit think tank based in Washington, DC that focuses on international development.[2][3][4]

Biography

Glassman's parents were foreign service officers,[5] so she lived in Cuba, Mexico, Argentina, and the Soviet Union throughout her childhood.[6] Glassman received her BA at Brown University in 1992 and MSc at the Harvard School of Public Health in 1996.[3]

Glassman served as the deputy director of the Global Health Financing Initiative at the Brookings Institution from 2005 to 2007.[3][7]

She served as the Principal Technical Lead for Health at the Inter-American Development Bank (2008–2010),[8] where she designed and evaluated public health programs including conditional cash transfer programs,[6] and designed the grant program Salud Mesoamerica 2015.[3][9]

In October 2011, Glassman became the director of global health policy at the Center for Global Development.[10] At the Center for Global Development, Glassman has worked on demand-side financing in Africa and incentives for health, as well as allocative efficiency.[6] She has studied state-level health policy in large decentralized countries like India, Pakistan, and Nigeria. In contrast with the World Bank and other organizations that work at the national level in these countries, Glassman has worked at the state level.[11]

Views

Glassman has defended the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's focus on vaccines, stating "For me, vaccination is the quintessential public health intervention. If we can't get that right, we probably shouldn't be doing other things."[12]

Glassman has criticized the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria for lack of transparency, writing that "very little quality information exists on how and where Global Fund money is spent, and what it is accomplishing" and that the "Global Fund must put as much energy into getting results as delivering rhetoric, pursuing performance verification with no less vigour than advocacy".[13]

Bibliography

Books authored or co-authored


Books and conference proceedings edited or co-edited=

  • Glassman, Amanda, Maria Luisa Escobar, Antonio Giuffrida, and Ursula Giedion, co-eds. From Few to Many: Ten Years of Health Insurance Expansion in Colombia. Washington: Interamerican Development Bank, 2009.

Reports

  • Glassman, Amanda, and Kalipso Chalkidou, co-chairs. Priority-Setting in Health Building Institutions for Smarter Public Spending: A Report of the Center for Global Development's Priority-Setting Institutions for Global Health Working Group. [Washington, D.C.]: Center for Global Development, 2012.
  • Glassman, Amanda. Demand-Sized Incentives for Better Health for the Poor: Conditional Cash Transfer Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean. Washington, DC: Inter-American Development Bank, Regional Operations Dept. II, 2006.
  • Glassman, Amanda, Jessica Todd, and Marie Gaarder. Performance-Based Incentives for Health: Conditional Cash Transfer Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean. Washington, D.C.: Center for Global Development, 2007.
  • Glassman, Amanda, Victoria Fan, and A. Mead Over. More Health for the Money: Putting Incentives to Work for the Global Fund and Its Partners : a Report of The Washington, DC: Center for Global Development, 2013.
  • Glassman, Amanda, Denizhan Duran, and Andy Sumner. Global Health and the New Bottom Billion What Do Shifts in Global Poverty and the Global Disease Burden Mean for GAVI and the Global Fund? Washington, DC: Center for Global Development, 2011. <http://www.cgdev.org/content/publications/detail/1425581/>.
  • Glassman, Amanda. Demand-Sized Incentives for Better Health for the Poor: Conditional Cash Transfer Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean. Washington, DC: Inter-American Development Bank, Regional Operations Dept. II, 2006.


Template:As of, Glassman has authored or coauthored at least 52 publications,[14] including articles in The Guardian.[15]. Except for the one book authored and the one collected work for which she was co-chair, they are all technical reports of magazine article. <red> WorldCat identies</ref>Among them are

  • The Health of Women in Latin America and the Caribbean (2001), with others[15]
  • Millions Saved: Proven Successes in Global Health (2004, 2007, 2016), with others[16][17]
  • From Few to Many: Ten Years of Health Insurance Expansion in Colombia (2009) with others[1][3]

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 From Few to Many. Inter-American Development Bank, Brookings Institution. 2009. http://idbdocs.iadb.org/wsdocs/getdocument.aspx?docnum=35026183. Retrieved June 7, 2016. 
  2. "Millions saved: how to make sure global health programs work". The Guardian. March 22, 2016. https://www.theguardian.com/health-revolution/2016/mar/22/millions-saved-book-healthcare-global-aid-policy. Retrieved June 2, 2016. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 "Amanda Glassman". Center for Global Development. http://www.cgdev.org/expert/amanda-glassman. Retrieved June 2, 2016. 
  4. Glassman, Amanda (April 7, 2016). "A Progress Report on the West Africa Ebola Epidemic". http://www.foreign.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/040716_Glassman_Testimony.pdf. Retrieved June 7, 2016. 
  5. Elie Dolgin (December 6, 2011). "Straight talk with... Amanda Glassman". Nature Medicine 17: 1534. Template:Citation error. http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v17/n12/full/nm1211-1534.html. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 "RBF Perspectives: Interview with Amanda Glassman on Conditional Cash Transfers (CCTs)". RBF Health. Archived from the original on August 6, 2016. https://web.archive.org/web/20160806163522/https://www.rbfhealth.org/resource/rbf-perspectives-interview-amanda-glassman-conditional-cash-transfers-ccts. Retrieved June 2, 2016. 
  7. "Amanda Glassman". Brookings Institution. https://www.brookings.edu/experts/amanda-glassman/. Retrieved September 23, 2016. 
  8. "Amanda Glassman". Americas Quarterly. http://www.americasquarterly.org/node/1676. Retrieved June 2, 2016. 
  9. "Amanda Glassman". World Bank. http://live.worldbank.org/experts/amanda-glassman. Retrieved June 7, 2016. 
  10. "Amanda Glassman - Info". ResearchGate. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Amanda_Glassman/info. Retrieved June 7, 2016. 
  11. "Conversation with Amanda Glassman on August 27, 2013". GiveWell. http://files.givewell.org/files/conversations/Amanda%20Glassman%208-27-13.pdf. Retrieved June 7, 2016. 
  12. Caroline Hartnell (September 1, 2011). "Interview – Amanda Glassman". Alliance Magazine. http://www.alliancemagazine.org/feature/interview-amanda-glassman/. Retrieved June 7, 2016. 
  13. Amanda Glassman (September 27, 2016). "Global Fund's $15bn must buy results rather than rhetoric". The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2013/sep/27/global-fund-results-aids-malaria-tuberculosis. Retrieved June 7, 2016. 
  14. "Amanda Glassman". ResearchGate. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Amanda_Glassman. Retrieved June 2, 2016. 
  15. 15.0 15.1 "Amanda Glassman". The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/profile/amanda-glassman. Retrieved June 7, 2016. 
  16. "Background". Center for Global Development. http://millionssaved.cgdev.org/about. Retrieved June 1, 2016. 
  17. "Millions Saved". Center for Global Development. Archived from the original on 2013-07-22. https://web.archive.org/web/20130722094617/http://www.cgdev.org/initiative/millions-saved. Retrieved 2013-07-04.