American Indian creationism

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Native American creation stories refer to metaphorical and allegorical stories, held among various Native American cultures and Native American religions that explain how human beings, the world, and sometimes the animals and other features of the world came to be.

Most modern people see these stories as metaphors, though some also believe that the stories contain hints about migration stories and other real aspects of their people's history.[1] Some are more literal in their understanding, and reject some aspects of both the theory of evolution or the Bering strait theory, arguing that Native American people originated in North America.[2]

Oral traditions

Oglala Lakota author, theologian and historian, Vine Deloria Jr., writing for Indian Country Today, stated Template:Quote

Deloria's book Red Earth, White Lies challenges scientific fact and claims that the findings of research on human evolution are myth, a "hilarious farce" (p. 182).[3] Deloria alleges that Native American creation stories and oral tradition actually contradict some aspects of scientific research.[4]

Criticism

Deloria's rejection of some of the scientific evidence on human evolution, early migration and the first settlement of the Americas sparked opposition.[5] One of his main critics, H David Brumble, an English Professor at the University of Pittsburgh, has openly expressed his criticisms toward this belief in some of his works, including his article, Vine Deloria, Creationism, and Ethnic Pseudoscience.[6]

Creation myths by tribe

References

  1. Deloria, Vine. Red Earth, White Lies: Native Americans and the Myth of Scientific Fact. Fulcrum Publishing, 1995. Print.
  2. Weaver, Jace (2001). Other Words: American Indian Literature, Law, and Culture. Oklahoma University Press. pp. 164–172. ISBN 978-0806133522. https://books.google.com/books?id=gQj_aQhYvfEC&pg=PA164&dq=American+Indian+Creationism&hl=en&sa=X&ei=OjBzU8vkGOSr0gXE-4DQDg&ved=0CDMQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=American%20Indian%20Creationism&f=false. 
  3. Deloria, Vine. Red Earth, White Lies: Native Americans and the Myth of Scientific Fact. Fulcrum Publishing, 1995. Print.
  4. Brumble, H. David. "Vine Deloria, Jr., Creationism, and Ethnic Pseudoscience." American Literary History 10.2 (1998): 335–346. Print.
  5. Francis, Norbert (2017). Postmodern creationism in academia: Why Evergreen matters. Quillette, October 29, 2017.
  6. Brumble, H. David. "Vine Deloria, Jr., Creationism, and Ethnic Pseudoscience." American Literary History 10.2 (1998): 335–346. Print.

External links