Cappy Burnside

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Template:Autobiography Template:Cleanup reorganize Lester Wade Burnside, Jr. (January 30, 1934 – August 30, 2014), better known as "Cappy" Burnside, was an American businessman. He was the driving force behind relocating the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division headquarters to North Central West Virginia[1] and also served on the board of directors of the Friends of West Virginia Public Radio from 1992 to 2006 (now Friends of West Virginia Public Broadcasting)[2] as well as other boards of directors and organizations.[3][4][5]

Lester W. "Cappy" Burnside, Jr.
File:File:Lester W. "Cappy" Burnside Jr., circa 1984.jpg
Cappy Burnside in his office circa 1984
Born Lester Wade Burnside, Jr.
Template:Birth date
Clarksburg, West Virginia United States
Died Template:Death date and age
Bridgeport, West Virginia
Monuments
  • Lester W. "Cappy" Burnside, Jr. Bridge, Bridgeport, West Virginia
  • Engraved plaque, West Virginia Life Sciences Center, Bridgeport, West Virginia
Education
Known for
  • Being the driving force behind the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division's move to Clarksburg, which brought thousands of jobs and many businesses and developments to North Central West Virginia.
  • His work with Friends of West Virginia Public Radio as a member of the board of directors (1992-2006), chairman of the board (1995) and treasurer (post-1995). He was known as "The Peacemaker" and given an award for his ability to settle disputes.
Spouse(s) Carolyn Reynolds Burnside m. 1956-2014 (his death)
Children
  • Mary Wade Burnside Triplett
  • Kate Burnside
Parents
  • Lester W. Burnside, Sr. (father)
  • Louise Nowery Burnside (mother)
Awards
  • American Society of Highway Engineers Man of the Year (1988)
  • Harrison County Chamber of Commerce Award for Outstanding Service to the Community and Special Recognition of FBI Efforts (1996)
  • Distinguished Mountaineer Award, by then-Governor Joe Manchin (2010)

Early life

Lester Wade Burnside, Jr. ("Cappy") was born on January 30, 1934, in Clarksburg, West Virginia to Lester W. "Brownie" Burnside, Sr. and Mary Louise Nowery.[6][7] Cappy married Carolyn Mae Reynolds in 1956.[8] They had two children: Kate Burnside[9] and Mary Wade Burnside Triplett.[6][10]

Education

Cappy Burnside attended Greenbrier Military School, graduating in 1951.[11] He attended West Virginia University, where he was a member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity[12] and a member of Scabbard and Blade (military honorary).[13] He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Commerce in 1955.[14] He was a lifetime member of the West Virginia University Alumni Association, a member of the Emeritus Club, and frequently contributed to the Old Gold Club.[15][16]

Military

Cappy Burnside entered the United States Army at the rank of Second Lieutenant and was posted to Fort Eustis, Virginia with his wife Carolyn in 1956, shortly after their marriage. When he and Carolyn moved back to Clarksburg, West Virginia in 1959, he continued in the United States Army Reserve where he achieved the rank of Captain before retiring from the military in the early 1960s.[6][15]

Consolidated Supply Company

Consolidated Supply Company was established in Clarksburg, West Virginia by Cappy Burnside's father, Lester W. “Brownie” Burnside, Sr. on April 29, 1929, as a West Virginia Domestic C | Corporation.[17] Cappy Burnside began working for his father at Consolidated Supply Company upon his return from Fort Eustis in 1958 as a salesman and was promoted to general manager within five years. In 1974, Brownie Burnside retired and Cappy became president and treasurer of Consolidated Supply Company.[6]

Consolidated Supply Company started with a plant in the West End of Clarksburg providing ready-mix concrete, sand, gravel, brick, other aggregates and commercial building supplies. Consolidated Supply Company eventually added industrial doors and locks to its inventory. A second plant opened in Bridgeport in the mid-1960s. The company was known in the Mid-Atlantic region for quality control; each batch of concrete was tested in an onsite lab. As a result, Consolidated Supply Company was asked to provide most of the concrete to the West Virginia Division of Highways[18] during the construction of Interstate 79, Corridor H, major road upgrades, as well as large-scale projects such as commercial buildings and cooling towers. Consolidated Supply Company also sold specialty brick products.

Both of Consolidated Supply Company's plants sustained considerable damage in the November 1985 floods that devastated West Virginia and surrounding states. The company recovered but subsequent damage, including a fire, complicated matters. He closed Consolidated Supply Company in 1992.[3][15]

State and community service

For most of his adult life, Cappy Burnside was actively involved in community and state activities; his involvement included contributions to the economic development of Clarksburg, Harrison County, and West Virginia as well as other activities contributing to the improvement of the community.[6][15] He served two consecutive terms as president of the Harrison County Chamber of Commerce[19] from 1987 to 1989.[6][20] In 1985, in response to a declining economy in the area, Cappy initiated a blue-ribbon committee of the Harrison County Chamber of Commerce in order to unify economic development efforts; this joint committee subsequently incorporated as Harrison 2000 with Cappy Burnside as president. Harrison 2000 would eventually oversee the relocation of the FBI Criminal Justice Identification Services Division to Clarksburg, West Virginia.[6][21]

Organizations

Boards of Directors:[6][15][16]

  • Mountaineer Country Travel Council board of directors
  • West Virginia Life Science Center board of directors
  • Association of Industrial Development board of directors
  • Builders' Supply Association of West Virginia board of directors 1965-1991, president 1969
  • Black Diamond Girl Scout Council board of directors
  • Boy Scouts of America, Central West Virginia Council board of directors
  • North Bend Rails to Trails Foundation Advisory Board
  • Salvation Army Advisory Board
  • Friends of West Virginia Public Radio board of directors 1992-2006, chairman 2004-2005, treasurer[4]

Other organizations:[6][15][16]

  • Mon Valley Tri-State Network
  • American Society of Highway Engineers, Central West Virginia Chapter, president 1989
  • Clarksburg Industrial Development Corporation, president 1989-1990
  • Miss West Virginia Scholarship Pageant, president 1979
  • Clarksburg Kiwanis Club, president 1969-1970
  • Clarksburg Planning and Zoning Commission, member 1963-1978

Awards

Cappy was the recipient of awards and recognition during his lifetime. They included:[15][16]

  • American Society of Highway Engineers Man of the Year (1988)
  • Harrison County Chamber of Commerce Award for Outstanding Service to the Community and Special Recognition of FBI Efforts (1996)
  • Distinguished Mountaineer Award, by then-Governor Joe Manchin (2010)

Bringing the FBI to Clarksburg, West Virginia: An Overview

In 1990, Senator Robert C. Byrd (D-WV), then-chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, inserted language in the fiscal 1990 "dire emergencies" appropriations bill promising the FBI $185 million for a fingerprint center, under the condition that it be located in Byrd's home state of West Virginia.[22]

Cappy Burnside with Sen. Robert C. Byrd in Byrd's Senate office after meeting about the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services project in Clarksburg, West Virginia

FBI Director William Sessions had written a letter to his friend Senator Byrd on May 8, 1990, declaring that the agency's fingerprint system "is now in danger of immediate collapse."[22] It was necessary to create a new, separate fingerprint center. The existing fingerprint center in Washington, D.C. had grown so large that four floors in the J. Edgar Hoover Building, which houses the FBI's main headquarters, had to be reinforced to support the weight of over 187 million fingerprint cards. Technology for computerized identification of fingerprints was available, but there was no room in the Hoover Building for the equipment. At the time, the bureau had a backlog of over 750,000 uncatalogued fingerprint cards and the number was rising. FBI files were becoming obsolete, making it nearly impossible for the FBI to meet the needs of law enforcement to identify fingerprints in a timely manner. In Director Sessions' desperation to solve a problem, Senator Byrd saw a perfect opportunity for a state-of-the-art fingerprint center to be built in his home state of West Virginia.[22][23] President George H.W. Bush quickly signed the "dire emergencies" appropriations bill and Senator Byrd had succeeded in securing thousands of jobs for West Virginians.[23][24]

The FBI had short-listed Clarksburg as a location for the new Criminal Justice Information Services Division from the beginning; Harrison 2000, the economic development group led by Cappy Burnside, spent long hours undertaking a diligent and arduous effort to ensure the FBI chose Clarksburg.[22] After much consideration and meeting with Harrison 2000 and local leaders, the FBI decided that Clarksburg was the ideal location.[25][26][27]

Opening in 1995 with over 1,000 employees, the FBI Criminal Justice Information Service Division in Clarksburg has grown to be the largest division of the FBI.[28][29] Other services located at this site include the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System ("IAFIS"),[30] Law Enforcement Enterprise Portal ("LEEP"),[31] LEO Enterprise Portal ("LEO-EP"),[32] Law Enforcement National Data Exchange ("N-DEx"),[33] National Crime Information Center ("NCIC"),[34] National Instant Criminal Background Check System ("NICS"),[35] Next Generation Identification ("NGI"),[36] and Uniform Crime Reporting ("UCR").[37] As of 2016, the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services in Clarksburg had over 3500 employees. Increased requests for background checks continue to create growth within the division.[38]

Background information: Harrison County's rise and fall—the dire need for jobs

During the 1800s and much of the 1900s, Harrison County and its county seat of Clarksburg were profitable centers of business and industry; when the railroad was built through the area in 1856, industry and commerce accelerated.[39] Coal, glass, oil and gas, drilling machinery, lumber, caskets, tin, graphite, pottery, and other industries provided plenty of jobs.Template:Sfn During this prosperous time, downtown Clarksburg had streets lined with busy retail stores, grand bank buildings, and elegant hotels.Template:Sfn

However, by the early to mid-1980s, cheap imports and buyouts by larger corporations that chose to close local factories began an economic downturn. Thousands of jobs were lost. In July 1986 Anchor-Hocking was the area's top employer—albeit being the last remaining glass factory—having just added to its workforce, bringing the total number of employees to 950.[40] However, in 1987, Newell Company purchased Anchor Hocking and decided to shut the plant down three months later.[41] Ultimately, the plant closed leaving nearly 1,000 workers unemployed. Retail stores were struggling or closing because people didn't have money to spend. Downtown Clarksburg had very few open businesses. Harrison County was economically devastated by the closing of its last glass plant and major employer, Anchor-Hocking.[42] Clarksburg as well as Harrison County as a whole needed help. Cappy Burnside had been trying to help as a member of the Harrison County Chamber of Commerce and other city and county development groups, and working long hours at Consolidated Supply Company. Once he learned the FBI was considering Clarksburg as a location for its new fingerprint division, he decided it was time to take the helm, put other business aside for the time being, and adopt the mission of bringing the FBI to Harrison County.[22][43][44]

The road to creating Harrison 2000 and consolidating economic development in Harrison County to meet FBI needs

In response to a steady loss of jobs in the area, Cappy Burnside initiated a Blue Ribbon Committee of the Harrison County Chamber of Commerce in 1985 in order to unify economic development efforts.[43] Several groups had been working separately with the same goals but he felt they could accomplish more if they worked in unison.[45] Cappy brought them together into one non-profit organization. This evolved into the Joint Committee for Economic Development. For their first project, this non-profit group eventually secured, along with the City of Clarksburg, $2.5 million in government grants; this was to build the West Virginia Life Sciences Center, an industrial park for biomedical companies.[42][46]

The Life Sciences Center was still under construction and tenants were being recruited when Cappy learned that the FBI was considering Clarksburg as a possible site.[22][45] Another member of the Joint Committee for Economic Development had heard that the State of West Virginia didn't believe that Harrison County was capable of handling a project of this magnitude. Cappy immediately contacted then-Governor Gaston Caperton's office; members of the Joint Committee met with Lysander Dudley, then-director of the Governor's Office of Community and Industrial Development.[47] An agreement was made that Harrison 2000 would be formed to be an umbrella for economic development leadership in Harrison County and the state's confidence problem with Harrison County was resolved.[43] The Joint Committee for Economic Development incorporated as Harrison 2000 in January 1990, with Cappy Burnside as president.[45] Harrison 2000 consisted of two representatives from the Harrison County Chamber of Commerce, the City of Clarksburg, the Association for Industrial Development, and the Harrison County Development Authority.[45] They would soon be overseeing the relocation of the FBI fingerprint center to Clarksburg, West Virginia.[22][21]

Senator Byrd secured the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services for West Virginia; Cappy Burnside saw an opportunity for jobs in Harrison County and North Central West Virginia

Once it was agreed that Harrison 2000, with Cappy Burnside as president, would oversee FBI's move to Clarksburg, the real work began. Other members of Harrison 2000 were concerned that Clarksburg didn't have a suitable location for the FBI. They considered the old Anchor-Hocking plant in Clarksburg, but immediately agreed that wouldn't be appropriate. It was too small and not in a secure location. Cappy, being familiar with the area with his experience working with the state, with engineering, and with planning and zoning, thought of a more rural location.[43] Other members didn't think the FBI would be interested; in fact, another member of Harrison 2000 who was present at the meeting where this was discussed said Cappy was nearly "laughed out of the room" for thinking that an old strip mine on the outskirts of Clarksburg would be the location that would ultimately meet the criteria of the FBI.[22][43][48]

Located adjacent to Interstate 79, of appropriate size and not visible to those outside the land, the former strip mine was approved by the FBI. Cappy had already approached the owner of most of the land and discussed the possibility of selling it if the FBI were willing to purchase it.[22][43][48] The FBI had approved of the land because was close to a main highway, close to the local airport, highly secure, and they would have easy access to newly-laid fiber optics.[25][48] In order to approve that property, the FBI insisted certain conditions be met.[22][49][50]

First, the FBI demanded a Clarksburg address but the property was just outside the known Clarksburg city limits. Bridgeport mayor Carl Furbee wanted the FBI to be located in Bridgeport because the City of Bridgeport would be able to collect taxes (starting with taxes on the construction) and reap other obvious benefits.[51] But the FBI insisted on Clarksburg—or another location. A battle between the cities took place that was taken to West Virginia Supreme Court. At one point Senator Byrd told them to resolve it or they—perhaps even West Virginia—would lose the FBI.[52] A solution was found: Cappy Burnside used his zoning and engineering skills to find a shoestring approach: he found a highway, abandoned roadway, and creek bed that led to the property. Bridgeport did fight this annexation, but Clarksburg prevailed and the FBI stayed in Harrison County.[22][43][53]

Aerial photo of the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services facility in Clarksburg, West Virginia

At that time, there was an agreement between then-Clarksburg Mayor James C. Hunt and then-Bridgeport Mayor Carl Furbee that the Clarksburg line would end outside the FBI property and the rest would be within the Bridgeport city limits, giving Bridgeport the revenue for the multitude of new developments and businesses to come.[54] Much development in the area was anticipated, and is continuing decades later. In August 1991, Hunt and Furbee ceremonially buried a "hatchet" to finally mark the end of the annexation problem between the cities.[48][55]

The next problem was a lack of direct access to the proposed FBI property; there was no paved road to the property and no direct exit or interchange to and from Interstate 79. The FBI refused to accept the property until the road situation was solved. FBI agents announced to Cappy and other Harrison 2000 members that, unless an interchange that allowed direct exit from Interstate 79 and a connecting road to the proposed property were constructed, they would seek another site for the fingerprint center.[43] The morning they were given that news, Cappy and two FBI agents drove to Charleston, West Virginia, the state capital. They met with Fred Vankirk, then-head of the West Virginia Department of Highways (now the West Virginia Department of Transportation).[56] Within a few hours, they had planned a road and interchange that the state and FBI both agreed upon. Later that day, they met with then-Governor Gaston Caperton and received final approval for the interchange (now Exit 124 from Interstate 79) and for the road that became State Route 279 and Jerry Dove Drive to the FBI. Cappy and the FBI agents returned that evening with the results: Even more jobs for West Virginians to build the road and interchange, and the FBI deal was saved.[43][57] The bridge that is the overpass that crosses Interstate 79, part of that interchange, was named after Cappy Burnside, the "driving force" behind the FBI, in 2014 in honor of all of the work he had done to attract the FBI and ensure they remained in Harrison County and even West Virginia. [6][58]

Cappy did a great deal of work for Harrison 2000 and the FBI transition, but he was humble and not one to take credit.[43] When he adopted the mission in 1990 to attract the FBI to Harrison County, he did not do it for himself; he did it because he wanted to bring jobs to Harrison County and make North Central West Virginia a better place.[43] Former Clarksburg Mayor, Clarksburg City Council member, and Harrison 2000 member James C. Hunt said that Cappy was always a real team player, but he was always the "first head in the huddle."[48] Hunt further referred to bringing the FBI to Harrison County as being Cappy Burnside's "swan song."[48] Although he did consulting work after his work with the FBI was complete (he closed his own company in 1992, partially because he spent so much time away from it during the FBI negotiations) and he still had work to do with West Virginia Public Radio, his efforts bringing the FBI to Harrison County and all the development, companies, and jobs that came after it was his last significant accomplishment for the community.[43]

Friends of West Virginia Public Radio Board of Directors

This pipe was presented to Lester W. "Cappy" Burnside Jr. after he played a key role in settling a dispute between the Friends of West Virginia Public Radio and West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Cappy Burnside was a member of the board of directors of Friends of West Virginia Public Radio (now Friends of West Virginia Public Broadcasting) from 1992 to 2006. He was chairman of the board in 2004-2005 and also held the position of treasurer.[4][59] Section under construction

After the FBI

After Cappy Burnside had dedicated a great deal of time to attracting the FBI to Harrison County and solving problems to ensure the FBI deal succeeded as president of Harrison 2000, Cappy became a bridge consultant. Cappy's full-time work with Harrison 2000 and time dedicated to FBI matters caused extended absences from his own office and Consolidated Supply Company went into decline. He closed his company in 1992.[43] He eventually went to work with Wolford Contractors Supply of St. Albans, West Virginia. He was able to use his expertise to work with builders, helping them secure "hardware" for bridge construction (forms) and secure scaffolding for bridge construction.[60] He continued this work, often from his home office, until approximately 2012—two years before his death at 80 years of age.[43][60] Jay Wolford, president of Wolford Contractors Supply, a supplier of bridge forms and other supplies, referred to Cappy as a "bridge deck expert" and said that Cappy was "one of the best [he] had ever seen."[60]

During his time on the board of Friends of West Virginia Public Radio, Cappy also spent a great deal of his time being a problem-solver for public broadcasting.[4][59]

Death and legacies

Cappy Burnside died of an extended illness in Bridgeport on August 30, 2014, at the age of 80.[15][16] He died with the knowledge that the bridge would be named in his honor, but did not live long enough to see its dedication on September 26, 2014, 27 days after his death.[61]

The Lester W. "Cappy" Burnside Jr. Bridge

A bridge to his legacy: the Lester W. "Cappy" Burnside, Jr. Bridge facing west toward the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division in Clarksburg, West Virginia

The bridge carrying West Virginia Route 279 over Interstate 79 to and from the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services Division on Jerry Dove Drive[62] was dedicated in Cappy Burnside's honor on September 26, 2014, 27 days after his death. This bridge is part of the interchange that Cappy had received approval in order to keep the FBI in Harrison County.[6][61][63]

The quality of life in North Central West Virginia continues to improve 25 years after FBI CJIS dedication

Section under construction

References

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  2. "Friends of West Virginia Public Broadcasting". West Virginia Public Broadcasting. http://www.wvpublic.org/friends-west-virginia-public-broadcasting#stream/0. Retrieved 1 November 2018. 
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  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 "Officers Elected". Charleston Gazette: p. D5. June 10, 1994. http://library.cnpapers.com/texis/search/+4ce_7bWeFhbtqWqwppOax1GD5omnaelV3nonDm5adhain5BaVoGtoDowap1xcoqaGwmodelz3qmhwwwmFqhWKKX5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWKKXtFqwrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d694bafa1. Retrieved 1 November 2018. "Board of Directors of the Friends of West Virginia Public Radio - L.W. Burnside, Bridgeport, chairman; Susan Hogan, Wheeling, vice chairwoman; Rhonda I. Stout, Alderson, secretary; and Rodger Melling, Elkview, treasurer." 
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  36. "Next Generation Identification (NGI)". Federal Bureau of Investigation. https://www.fbi.gov/services/cjis/fingerprints-and-other-biometrics/ngi. Retrieved 15 October 2018. 
  37. "Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program". Federal Bureau of Investigation. https://www.fbi.gov/services/cjis/ucr. Retrieved 15 October 2018. 
  38. Swiger, Darlene J. (Jan 11, 2016). "FBI to add more than 230 jobs at Clarksburg facility". Clarksburg Exponent Telegram. https://www.wvnews.com/theet/news/local/fbi-to-add-more-than-jobs-at-clarksburg-facility/article_8f835322-98ef-56cc-9164-ee7cfb7e242f.html. Retrieved 10 October 2018. 
  39. Davis, Dorothy (1970). Sloan, Elizabeth. ed. History of Harrison County, West Virginia. Parsons, West Virginia: McClain Printing Company. pp. 804–05. ISBN 087012-088-3. 
  40. "Anchor Hocking now top Clarksburg employer". Charleston Gazette: p. A5. July 8, 1986. http://library.cnpapers.com/cgi-bin/texis/search/+rmed_W+eFhbtqwqzmxwwwmFqhWK8X5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWK8XtFqJEDqrdGaldqAoDtaNdiaRdpagcwGA5x1Gta0MpcdOnGrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d1838c1437. Retrieved 4 November 2018. "Anchor Hocking Glass Corp. is now Clarksburg's leading industry with the gradual recall and addition of about 500 workers, state and company officials announced Monday." 
  41. Geiger, Bob (August 17, 1987). "Outlook bleak for Clarksburg residents". Charleston Gazette: p. A1. http://library.cnpapers.com/cgi-bin/texis/search/+sm9eU88ixFqwqzmxwwwmFqhWK8X5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWK8XtFqTZ1BcddAaFcnwAahdGagcwGA5x1Gta2n5omnDB5rFqw/storypage.html?id=47d183bc11c. Retrieved 4 November 2018. "The news of the planned shutdown came less than two months after Illinois-based Newell Corp. bought Anchor Hocking's three consumer and industrial glass plants. Local politicians are scrambling to get Newell executives to change their minds or to find a buyer for the plant. But then-Clarksburg Mayor Mildred Zink admitted that the chances of keeping the plant were slim." 
  42. 42.0 42.1 "Industrial park may rejuvenate Clarksburg". Charleston Gazette: p. C1. October 8, 1989. http://library.cnpapers.com/cgi-bin/texis/search/+KmevCW+eFhbtqwqzmxwwwmFqhWK8X5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWK8XtFq7fDm15BGowcapwGAaMwOaGnz1VnDwBnagcwGA5x1GtrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d18418bdf. Retrieved 4 November 2018. "The fate of the employees has been itemized: about one-third found other jobs in the area; third simply dropped out of the workforce through retirement or other reasons, and about 10 percent packed and left. Officials have not been able to determine what happened to the rest. There is little question the fall of 1987 marked an ending for Clarksburg." 
  43. 43.00 43.01 43.02 43.03 43.04 43.05 43.06 43.07 43.08 43.09 43.10 43.11 43.12 43.13 Aman, CPA, Thomas L. (September 28, 2018). "Statement". 
  44. Murray, Brittany (September 27, 2014). "'Cappy' Burnside honored with local bridge dedication". Clarksburg Exponent-Telegram: p. A12. https://www.wvnews.com/theet/news/local/cappy-burnside-honored-with-local-bridge-dedication/article_5a0080dc-45e5-11e4-8f21-5374dc6b5570.html. Retrieved 1 November 2018. "Lester Burnside spent his entire working life providing materials for bridges and highways, and in 1990, he adopted the mission to attract the FBI to Harrison County, Carolyn Burnside said." 
  45. 45.0 45.1 45.2 45.3 "Old, new growth Harrison 2000 goal". Charleston Gazette: p. D2. May 17, 1990. http://library.cnpapers.com/texis/search/+DmefE-WeFhbtqwqzmxwwwmFqhWKKX5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWKKXtFqfdcmCaDniatGdiBrarwGGo5dDa+XXXatdwcrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d67ec2d05. Retrieved 31 October 2018. 
  46. "Many jobs likely from Harrison project". Charleston Gazette: p. A5. September 30, 1989. http://library.cnpapers.com/texis/search/+GmreJN8ixFqycohna5qonDqn5arwGGo5dDaqd1DBOqzmxwwwmFqhWK8X5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWK8XtFqwrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d184171563. Retrieved 31 October 2018. 
  47. Seiler, Fanny (April 24, 1990). "Hechler reports possible deceptive polling for Rahall". Charleston Gazette: p. A5. http://library.cnpapers.com/texis/search/+Ete9RQWeFhbtqpcO5wDmnGam1mcnOqzmdwwwmFqhWKKX5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWKKXtFqwrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d67ec0921. Retrieved 1 November 2018. "Hechler said Lysander Dudley, ex-director of the Governor's Office of Community and Industrial Development, was representing former Gov. Arch Moore, who was chairman of the board for the Consolidated Investment Fund." 
  48. 48.0 48.1 48.2 48.3 48.4 48.5 Hunt, James C. (October 8, 2018). "Statement". 
  49. Murray, Brittany (September 27, 2014). "'Cappy' Burnside honored with local bridge dedication". Clarksburg Exponent-Telegram: p. A12. https://www.wvnews.com/theet/news/local/cappy-burnside-honored-with-local-bridge-dedication/article_5a0080dc-45e5-11e4-8f21-5374dc6b5570.html. Retrieved 1 November 2018. "Without Cappy, I know this wouldn't have been here in Harrison County, and it was extremely iffy if it would've happened at all,' he said. Burnside was of utmost importance in gaining the land to build the FBI, [FBI Supervisory Special Agent-in-Charge] Flynn said. 'After Cappy got the land, we had to sell it to the FBI and to the Congress,' he said. 'Lo and behold in January 1991, we were able to get the land package settled, sold, and we were in business. We knew right then and there this project was really going to happen." 
  50. Woodrum, Robert (March 22, 1994). "FBI staking future hopes on history-rich parcel". Charleston Gazette: p. B1. http://library.cnpapers.com/cgi-bin/texis/search/+Dtet7H+eFhbtqp-FfaoDBnGqrwDtnqzmDwwwmFqhWKKX5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWKKXtFqwrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d694b3405. Retrieved 3 November 2018. 
  51. Formanek, Jr., Ray (February 24, 1991). "Both Clarksburg, Bridgeport Have Eye on the Prize". Charleston Gazette: p. C1. http://library.cnpapers.com/cgi-bin/texis/search/+Cmaek88ixFqwqzmxwwwmFqhWKKX5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWKKXtFqkxdBragcwGA5x1GtCaxGomtnpdGBarwVnanOnadDaBrnapGoSnrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d684bf26. Retrieved 4 November 2018. 
  52. "End Harrison flap now, Byrd says". Charleston Gazette: p. B6. February 2, 1991. http://library.cnpapers.com/cgi-bin/texis/search/+hmemml+eFhbtqBxOGmawDDnLwBodDa-FfqzmxwwwmFqhWKKX5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWKKXtFqwrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d6846941. Retrieved 3 November 2018. 
  53. "Judge declares site belongs to Clarksburg". June 22, 1991. p. A3. http://library.cnpapers.com/cgi-bin/texis/search/+rmeQkH+eFhbtq741mtnamnqcwGn5a5oBnaxncdDt5aBdagcwGA5x1GtqzmxwwwmFqhWKKX5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWKKXtFqwrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d687065cd. Retrieved 3 November 2018. "Clarksburg used a meandering 'shoestring' approach to tether the city to the site in its bid. Clarksburg officials buttressed their argument by saying that FBI officials wanted the center in their city because of improved city services, fire and police protection." 
  54. "Bridgeport drops annexation appeal". Charleston Gazette: p. A9. August 3, 1991. http://library.cnpapers.com/cgi-bin/texis/search/+QceWtl+eFhbtqGr1DBah1GxnnawtGnnqzmhwwwmFqhWKKX5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWKKXtFqwrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d6870a77a. Retrieved 3 November 2018. 
  55. Davis, Jim (December 15, 2012). "Jim Hunt prepares to end tenure on Clarksburg City Council". https://www.wvnews.com/theet/news/local/jim-hunt-prepares-to-end-tenure-on-clarksburg-city-council/article_2ed48e5a-472f-11e2-81c3-001a4bcf887a.html. Retrieved 14 October 2018. 
  56. "Fred Vankirk". West Virginia University. https://cee.statler.wvu.edu/alumni-friends/the-west-virginia-academy-of-civil-engineers-members/fred-vankirk. Retrieved 1 November 2018. 
  57. Balow, Jim (February 1, 1991). "Mystery removed from FBI's plans". Charleston Gazette: p. C1. http://library.cnpapers.com/cgi-bin/texis/search/+cmJoe0UVwFqwqzmxwwwmFqhWKKX5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRS3tWKKXtFqHMO5BnGOaGnMdVnmahGdMa-FoeTzxDpcwD5rFqw/storypage.html?id=47d684644d. Retrieved 3 November 2018. 
  58. Murray, Brittany (September 27, 2014). "'Cappy' Burnside honored with local bridge dedication". Clarksburg Exponent-Telegram: p. A12. https://www.wvnews.com/theet/news/local/cappy-burnside-honored-with-local-bridge-dedication/article_5a0080dc-45e5-11e4-8f21-5374dc6b5570.html. Retrieved 1 November 2018. "Burnside was also involved in developing a highway interchange, leading to the future development that would follow in the area." 
  59. 59.0 59.1 Hutchison, Ron (July 11, 1995). "TV Talk". Charleston Gazette: p. D6. http://library.cnpapers.com/cgi-bin/texis/search/+VmeWPt6eFhbtq-x1GD5omnael8whxcoqaGwmodelGBxGonDm5qzmqwwwmFqhWKKX5hFq0eRGlnGeRRHmqwceRkHmGprveRDxxLo5eRDwmWKKXtFqwrFqw/storypage.html?id=47d56c42c3f. Retrieved 9 November 2018. 
  60. 60.0 60.1 60.2 Wolford, Jay (November 9, 2018). "Statement of Jay Wolford, President of Wolford Contracting Supply". 
  61. 61.0 61.1 Murray, Brittany (September 27, 2014). "'Cappy' Burnside honored with local bridge dedication". p. A1,A12. https://www.wvnews.com/theet/news/local/cappy-burnside-honored-with-local-bridge-dedication/article_5a0080dc-45e5-11e4-8f21-5374dc6b5570.html. Retrieved 9 November 2018. 
  62. "Jerry Dove". Federal Bureau of Investigation. https://www.fbi.gov/history/wall-of-honor/jerry-dove. 
  63. Burnside, Mary Wade (September 25, 2014). "A bridge to his legacy". Clarksburg Exponent-Telegram: p. A2.