ElectroYoga

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The term ElectroYoga is commonly used to describe a type of music event that features the practice of yoga with electronic music, often at large public events either indoors or outdoors in a park preferably while on earthing or grounded yoga mats.[1] Grounding is a process where a person places a part of their bare body on the earth, preferably granite or sand which is a highly conductive material. In the practice of Yoga, this involves the participant to minimize the use of clothing to allow a good bond to the earth's surface. Grounding neutralizes any static charges that the body absorbs from the environment such as walking on wool carpets, driving in cars and using devices that emit an electromagnetic field. Grounding also permits the electric fields within the earth to directly enter the human body. Depending upon the proximity to high tension power lines and sub-stations, grounding can have both healthful and harmful effects to animals and humans. A high ground current often causes stray voltage stray voltage which is a problem in animal husbandry. The stray voltage that travels along the earth's surface enters one leg of the animal and exits the other leg. In the cattle industry, this process often effects milk production. To minimize a potential stray voltage problem in the practise of Yoga outdoors, there are grounded yoga mats with an upper conductive surface that is bonded to rubber that insulates the user from the surface of the earth but still allows a single contact point via a grounding rod. The stray voltage passes harmlessly under the grounded yoga mat but still allows the yoga practiser to be bonded to the natural electromagnetic field of the earth.

The term ElectroYoga is also used to describe forms of yoga that requires the use of an electric heater to enhance its practice. Its origins began in India where the practice of yoga was done outdoors almost nude, grounded to the earth without the use of a mat in direct sun light which caused the body to perspire. With the introduction of an infrared sauna infrared (IR) technology for home use, "hot yoga" studios equipped with large electric industrial IR heaters became popular in the late 1970's. There is also yoga mats that contain infrared elements to heat the body.[2] IR heating is considered safe to use because the electromagnetic fields emitted are in the same invisible infrared spectrum found within the light of the sun and our body's DNA have adapted to it since birth. The technical term for this type of yoga is referred to as Hot ElectroYoga.

With the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, electromagnetic field therapy from the republics of the former Soviet Union was adopted by the German speaking countries of Austria, Switzerland, Germany and Liechtenstein. Originally this form of therapy involved the use of a large round electromagnetic Tesla coil that was energized by a frequency generator. The user would place a portion of their body inside the coil and when it was energized with electricity, the resulting electromagnetic field would stimulate the various cells of the body. Eventually the cylinder coils were replaced by flat spiral patented Tesla coils and inserted into flat mattress pads. The health effects from the magnetic fields varied depending upon the duration, intensity, frequency and shape of the waveform that was utilized. The majority of this form of therapy utilized frequencies that resembled the Earth's natural magnetic field and the intensity of the electromagnetic field would not cause a thermal effect that would heat the core body temperature. This therapy became very popular in private Swiss clinics and was eventually commercialized for home use and in wellness centres that offer Yoga. This type of Yoga is referred to as ElectroYoga and is most often used for the final resting pose known as Shavasana.

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