Jose Luis Gonzalez (artist)

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Jose Luis Gonzalez (also known as J.L. Goez, Joe L. Gonzalez) has over fifty-eight years in the field of fine arts as a designer, painter, muralist, sculptor, restorer, ceramist, importer, and arts administrator. He is versatile in designing, executing, and installing of murals, shrines, monuments and restoration of the same. Gonzalez has devoted his lifetime to the recognition and training of Chicano artists in the United States, with results that have won him international acclaim. He received a City of Los Angeles Certificate of Service, for his chairmanship of The Los Angeles City Bi-Centennial Committee from Mayor Tom Bradley on 28 September 1976. He also received the Bronze Medallion of Mexico City from Dr. Carlos Hank Gonzalez, Mayor of Mexico City, in 1981 for his contributions toward the Mexico City is Sister City of Los Angeles project. In 1984 Peter Ueberroth, President of the Olympic Committee, along with Harry L. Usher and Paul Ziffren, presented him a Certificate and Bronze Medal for his contributions to the success of the 23rd Olympiad held in Los Angeles known also as the 1984 Olympics.

Notable projects

Gonzalez’s projects reflect his pioneering spirit, the Goez Art Studio and Gallery, which included The East Los Angeles School of Mexican American Fine Arts which later became the Goez Institute of Murals and Fine Arts, a non-profit organization geared towards the development of talented youth in the area of fine arts, has been responsible for countless murals gracing major developments in the Los Angeles area. Jose Luis Gonzalez was invited by Los Angeles Commissioners of Public Works to join as member of the United States Bi-centennial Committee and Chaired the Committee from 1975 to 1976. Jose Luis Gonzalez designed the logo for this Committee which graced all the presentations awarded and stationery.

Jose Luis Gonzalez assisted the office of Mayor Tom Bradley, and arranged an exhibit named “Imagenes de la Raza: Self Portrayals of Mexican-American Culture”, consisting of works by at least 40 artists for the Amerika Haus Berlin in conjunction with Horizonte’ 82 - 2nd Festival of World Cultures, Berlin, June-July 1982. This exhibit exemplified by samplings of some of the finest Chicano art works in various forms of paintings, films, sculpture, murals, graphics and literature collected from many of the area’s leading cultural institutions including the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, NOSOTROS theatrical organization, Plaza de la Raza Cultural Center, Barrio Bilingual Communications, Caminos Magazine, Teatro Campesino, and the Goez Institute of Murals and Fine Arts brought hope that it will build new bridges of understanding and friendship between our two countries.

Memberships

  • Los Angeles Bi-Centennial Hispanic Culture sub-Committee Chairman, 1976
  • Who’s Who in American Art, 1976 – 1984
  • US Bi-Centennial Committee
  • 21 Committee of Los Angeles
  • 200th Committee Birthday of Los Angeles
  • The East Los Angeles Community Union, Board Chairman
  • Maravilla Foundation Board Chairman

Awards and recognitions

  • In the mid 1970’s, the Goez Imports and Fine Arts Gallery and Studio was chosen as one of five in the nation to be filmed and shown nationally as an example for its accomplishments by a minority organization geared towards the betterment of its community through human development.
  • TELACU Business Person of the month, December 1975
  • Los Angeles Hispanic Bi-Centennial Committee as Chairman, 1975-1976
  • Los Angeles Bi-Centennial Hispanic Culture Subcommittee, Mayor Tom Bradley,David Lozano, Mark Russak, 1976
  • Los Angeles for outstanding contributions to the City, Mayor Tom Bradley, April 25, 1976
  • Resolution by the Honorable [[Art Torres[[, Fifty-sixth Assembly District, April 25, 1976
  • City of Los Angeles Certificate of Service, The Los Angeles City Bi-Centennial Committee, Inc., Mayor Tom Bradley, September 28, 1976
  • TELACU Board of Directors, February 3, 1977
  • Los Angeles from Edmund D. Edelman, Supervisor Third District for the City Terrace Library mural, “Ofrenda Maya”, 1978-1979
  • Sixteenth of September Festival Committee, 1980
  • County of Los Angeles Dedication to the Arts, Edmund D. Edelman, Chairman, Board of Supervisors, for opening of the Olvera gallery, 1981
  • Bronze Medallion of Mexico City from Dr. Carlos Hank Gonzalez, Mayor of Mexico City, 1981. Mexico City is Sister City of Los Angeles.
  • Los Angeles 1984 Olympics Peter Ueberroth, President of the Olympic Committee, Harry L. Usher and Paul Ziffren, Certificate and bronze medal for his contribution to the success of the 23rd Olympiad
  • Dewar’s Profile Class of 1975 by Henry Yoris, U.S. Business Managers, Dewar’s, February 23, 1989, Dallas Texas
  • City of Los Angeles from Richard Alarcon for the Al Jabal mural, June 25, 1994
  • Boyle Heights College Institute, November 16, 2005
  • Los Angeles Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa, November 16, 2005
  • Union Bank of California and KCET Local Hero of the Year Award, September14, 2007

Early life

Jose Luis Gonzalez arrived at Grand Central Station in Los Angeles, California, in March 1947 at the age of eight years old. His father was Juan Salazar Gonzalez born in Belen del Refugio, Jalisco, Mexico. His mother was Maria Guadalupe Duarte de Gonzalez born in Morensi, Arizona, USA. Gonzalez was born as an American citizen because mother was born in Morensi, Arizona, USA. His mother was taken to Mexico when she was only six years old, where she was raised and married. The law states that if you are born of an American citizen before 1940, you would automatically become an American citizen.

Father was a carpenter, owned his own shop, made furniture and doors for churches and private clients. By the age of 5, Joe knew what the carpenter’s tools were for; the plane, hammer, saw, and square. Joe’s father, Juan’s store was robbed of all his tools and equipment after which he decided to move his family to the United States since he had come to the US during the Bracero movement and his wife, Guadalupe, was a citizen of the US. Joe first attended Pio Pico School in Pico Rivera, later Malabar Street School in East Los Angeles. He was enrolled in Assumption Catholic School at age 9 until he graduated, then entered Don Bosco Technical Institute. With a career that covers almost 6 decades in the art world, Gonzalez sees no time to slow down. With other projects too numerous to mention and a gross of disciplines in the art world too few could match. Gonzalez is truly a unique individual with countless new projects and the full support of his three sons Joe L. Jr., Manuel, and Arthur, both the artist and the studio will continue to prosper. Always, however, extending a helping hand along the way.

Education and influences

  • 1948-1956 Pio Pico School, Pico Rivera; Malabar Street School, Los Angeles, Assumption Catholic School, Los Angeles
  • 1956-1959 Attended and graduated from Don Bosco Technical Institute, San Gabriel, CA
  • 1961-1964 East Los Angeles College, studied engineering and art, at which time he met two life-long friends and fellow artists, Eddie Martinez and Robert Arenivar. In 1962, Mr. Gonzalez while in the course of conversation with Eddie Martinez and Robert Arenivar had mentioned that he would someday have an art studio.
  • 1965-1968 Private Lessons in sculpture under Professor Olinto Marcucci Ramirez
  • 1957-1986 Maintained a close friendship with and studied under the famed Rudolf Vargas, until his death on November 7, 1986.
  • 1966-1968 Private painting lessons under Professor Aldana, Rufino Tamayo: Jose Luis Gonzalez met Rufino Tamayo in the 70’s through the Mexican Consulate and maintained a close relationship up until his death on June 24, 1991. Jose Luis Gonzalez notes how he appreciated his sense for color.
  • 1976 – Jose Luis Gonzalez obtained his B General Building Contractors license from Contractors’ State License Board on April 23, 1976
  • In the mid 70’s, Jose Luis Gonzalez was President of the Philarmonia Pacifica
  • In the mid 70’s, Jose Luis Gonzalez was a member of Mayor Tom Bradley’s “City Art Advisory Panel.”
  • Other Influences were from Professor Aldana, Angel Hernandez, Olinto Marcucci Ramirez and Rudolph Vargas.

Career objectives

Gonzalez’s objectives have always been the recognition of artists and the development of the fine arts, through continued promotion of community awareness and the participation in the arts process, to create an environment where Chicano artists can intermingle, learn from one another, and help develop the talented youth in the area, while practicing the motto of “EDIFICATION THROUGH BEAUTIFICATION”. He strived to provide the artists with the best facilities to work and display their work and to provide the supplies needed to expand.

By 1969 Mr. Gonzalez decided to start an art studio and gallery in the community. Jose Luis Gonzalez was the President and Founder of Goez Imports and Fine Arts Gallery and Studio. This was the first art studio and gallery in the country to dedicate its resources to Chicano art and artists. It started when, in November of 1969, Mr. Gonzalez moved into an old meat packing plant converting this meat packing plant to a viable art gallery and studio. The first gallery studio of its kind ever developed in a predominately Mexican-American community. Jose Luis contacted his brother, Juan, who was living in Spain at the time, to come and help him in the endeavor. Juan invited his friend from high school, David Botello, and Jose Luis invited Robert Arenivar whose artistic contributions enhanced the creation of many murals and designs. Having formed this nucleus, Mr. Gonzalez created a following of other Chicano artists who enhanced the creation of many murals and designs throughout the East Los Angeles community. The grand opening of the Goez Art Studio and Gallery was held on December 5, 1971.

Gonzalez has devoted his lifetime to the recognition and training of Chicano artists in the United States, with results that have won him international acclaim. Gonzalez’s projects reflect his pioneering spirit, the Goez Art Studio and Gallery, which included The East Los Angeles School of Mexican American Fine Arts which later became the Goez Institute of Murals and Fine Arts, a non-profit organization geared towards the development of talented youth in the area of fine arts, has been responsible for countless murals gracing major developments in the Los Angeles area. In order for Goez Art Studio and Gallery to be self-sustaining, Jose Luis Gonzalez developed the method of marketing works that were produced at the Goez Institute of Murals Fine Arts and sold at the Goez Gallery providing needed monies for the artists and for the continual operation of the establishment. Mr. Gonzalez believed strongly that artists needed to learn to be self-sufficient instead of depending on grants and outside contributions. Thereby, proving that their production was marketable allowing the artist to be self-sustained.

Career

1. 1954-1956 Mills Engineering, press and Die and Assembly; 2. 1956-1957 Weber and Showcase, Finishing Department 3. 1957-1969 Fusek’s Studio, Designer, creator, photography, art director, and restorer, mainly dealing in religious art 4. 1969-Present President and Founder of Goez Imports and Fine Arts, Gallery and Studios -The East Los Angeles School of Mexican American Fine Arts; Executive Director of the Goez Institute of Murals and Fine Art, a school specially designed to teach in the apprenticeship method of instruction. As President of Goez and Executive Director of The East Los Angeles School of Mexican American Fine Arts (TELASOMAFA) his job was to procure funding, to prepare the contracts, to write proposals, to know about the subject that the theme of each mural was going to consist of, to art direct it in making sure that the murals stay within the theme and subject matter and to be historically and artistically correct, and to be project director in making sure that the entire project from concept design to final production and installation is completed correctly and timely, making sure that all specifications to the project were carried out as called for, besides taking care of sales, service orders, restoration and plus the installations, presentations, guiding tours, materials and supplies purchases, most of the time involved in public relations, and just simply taking care of business. In fact, most of the visitors to Goez thought that he was just the agent, broker or representative of the artists. The series of activities that had to be conducted in order to carry out the business had to be managed by none other than the person who started the whole thing, thereby eliminating the chances and the luxury of performing or designing or creating anything with the serenity of an artist, unless as in many cases, he either went home very late or came to work extremely early. 5. The ongoing activities at the GOEZ ART STUDIO and GALLERY plus the production of many murals in the community contributed to the development of East Los Angeles into a tourist attraction receiving commendations to this effect from the City, County and State. 6. 1971 Teaching: Instruction, restoration, painting and sculpture, East Los Angeles School of Mexican American Fine Arts 1971 7. Chairman of Los Angeles Hispanic Bicentennial Cultural Committee 1974 8. Jose Luis Gonzalez was invited by Los Angeles Commissioners of Public Works to join as member of the United States Bi-centennial Committee and Chaired the Committee from 1975 to 1976. Jose Luis Gonzalez designed the logo for this Committee which graced all the presentations awarded and stationery. 9. Dewar’s Profile,[1] numerous national magazines and newspapers 1975 10. Established a second Goez gallery at Disneyland, Seaports of the Pacific, 1980 11. Established a third Goez Art Studio and Gallery at TELACU Industrial Park, 1981 to present 12. Established a fourth Goez gallery at Olvera Street, 1981 to 1988 13. Up to the present, Mr. Gonzalez has continued active in the field of fine arts.

Style and Technique: Realism

Media: A variety of mediums; such as Oil, Marble, Bronze, Ceramic Tile, wood carving, statues, watercolor

Career and achievements

In 1957, Mr. Adolf Fusek of Fusek’s Studios submitted a request to Father Pena, the Principle of Don Bosco Technical Institute, for a young man who could design, construct, photograph and learn the trade of restoration and other trades in the art field. Jose Luis Gonzalez was unanimously picked by the Principle, the priests and the brothers for this position at Fusek’s Studios. During his 12 ½ years at Fusek’s Studios, Jose Luis Gonzalez designed, produced, and installed crosses, pedestals for statues to stand on, brackets for special installations for large statues and crucifixes, stations of the cross, life size nativity sets, hand carved wooden statues, and hand carved marble statues, for Churches, Schools and religious institutions throughout Southern California and into Las Vegas Nevada.

In 1957, even before graduating from Don Bosco Technical Institute, in June of 1959, Jose Luis Gonzalez was already working in various areas in the fine arts, gaining experience and practicing at Fusek’s Studios as a designer, painter, restorer, and installer of religious art, where he was first exposed in the newspaper, The Tidings, May of 1957, for having restored an 11-foot statue of Our Lady of Guadalupe used for Mary’s Hour in the field of the Los Angeles Coliseum. The statue of Our Lady of Guadalupe was made of fiberglass and showed a lot of damage and paint totally worn away. It had to be primed and painted. It was painted with authentic colors of the Virgen of Guadalupe. Sculptor Herald Wilson of La Jolla, California originally made the statue.

In 1958 and 1959, the young Mr. Gonzalez designed, executed, and installed a mosaic mural in the back of the Fusek’s Studios of the Virgen de Guadalupe, measuring approximately 8’ by 30’. During the time that Jose Luis was at Fusek’s Studios, in the early 60’s, he was starting to market woodcarvings under the name of GOEZ, at the Great Western, in the city of Commerce in California. With this endeavor Jose Luis was researching the possibilities of becoming independent.

In early 1969, a Shrine to the Virgen de Guadalupe at the Santuario de Guadalupe Catholic Church, Sanctuary of Our Lady of Guadalupe, on Third Street in East Los Angeles was completed. It was a mosaic depicting the hill of Tepeyac showing Juan Diego opening up his tilma and roses falling down uncovering the image of the Virgen de Guadalupe. There is an image of the Virgen carved in different colors of marble that is anchored to the wall and it is a relief. There are four hand carved marble statues carved in carrara marble, one of Juan Diego opening his tilma displaying a mosaic tile of the Virgen de Guadalupe inlaid into the marble, Bishop Zumaraga and a priest. This was one of Jose Luis Gonzalez’s first projects that he designed and produced in the community of East Los Angeles. The team that assisted Mr. Gonzalez on this project were: Joe, Armando, Benjamin, and Danny Gaytan – all brothers-in-law; his son, Joey, Jr.; his brother, Juan; Mila, a mosaic artist; and Jessie Corella. The four marble statues were hand carved in Italy. This site is located at 4100 E 2nd St, Los Angeles, CA 90063. This project was funded by the Utter McKinley Mortuary.

In 1969, Jose Luis Gonzalez founded the Goez Art Studio and Gallery in an old meat packing plant at First and Gage in East Los Angeles. This was the first art studio and gallery in the country to dedicate its resources to Chicano arts and artists. Mr. Gonzalez states that after almost 7 months of steady hard labor of at least 12 to 16 hours a day, of destruction and construction, the joy and pleasure of accomplishing the major plan of making Goez Art Studio one of the most attractive and distinctive art centers and gallery with the hopes and anticipation of attracting the art buyers that would help to inspire the artists to create their best for self-sustainment. This was the first Goez Art Gallery, located at 3757 E First Street, Los Angeles CA.

During the time of the construction of the art studio, in 1969 to 1970, one of his earliest accomplishments was the restoration of a beautiful and extremely valuable painting by Flemish Artist David Teniers the Younger, a painter of the Flemish Baroque Era, for the famous Metcalf Gallery in Pasadena, California. David Teniers the Younger was the Son-in-Law of Jan “Velvet” Brugel from 1610-1690. Mr. Metcalf told Jose Luis that he was never able to enjoy this painting because he felt something was missing. The painting had been restored by someone else many years before. Jose Luis reports that during the restoration one night he felt the hands of David Teniers guiding him in this project. He even got chills. He felt that David Teniers was showing him how to correctly apply the paint and make the same brushstrokes. Jose Luis uncovered a fisherman in the river with a net; a woman throwing water from a pail out the door; the thatched roof; a large tree that had been covered by clouds. Mr. Metcalf brought out a white light and a blue light to shine onto the picture when it was completed to get a good look and told Mr. Gonzales that he had never been able to enjoy the painting until that moment. He was very happy to see the painting restored to its original state.

The development of Goez became a vehicle which led to many events taking place in the East Los Angeles community related to the fine arts, including many art exhibits in universities in California and countless murals throughout Southern California and Arizona. Goez held the first and largest art exhibit of its kind ever in the nation, involving over 95 Mexican-American or Chicano artists. 9. Goez contributed to the community as the first gallery museum type of atmosphere where year-round tours of students from pre-school to university level were an ongoing activity. 10. Goez provided placement of artists into permanent jobs pertaining to their field in the fine arts. 11. Goez was responsible for giving Chicano artists international exposure through a filming of community murals by German and French film companies and the introduction of their organization internationally through radio. 12. Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned in 1970 to restore the 1000 year old marble sarcophagus that contained ashes of Mahatma Gandhi along with other significantly historical ancient pieces for the Self Realization Fellowship. 13. Jose Luis restored the marble statue of Maha Mundra for the Self Realization Fellowship. 14. In the mid 1970’s, the Goez Imports and Fine Arts Gallery and Studio was chosen as one of five in the nation to be filmed and shown nationally as an example for its accomplishments by a minority organization geared towards the betterment of its community through human development. 15. From the 1970’s through the mid 1990’s, Mr. Gonzalez made hundreds of television and radio show appearances, as well as mention in many newspapers and magazine articles. Mr. Gonzalez arranged many exhibitions bringing exposure to help promote the Chicano artists and their works in line with educating the community at large through beautification of their own community and the arts. 16. In 1970, Mr. Gonzalez received an invitation from Universal Studios for the famous October Fest. Jose Luis produced an art exhibit where all the artists and their works were exhibited for sale. This was a first for Chicano artists. 17. The first largest art exhibit held, in 1971, with GOEZ involved over 95 Mexican-American or Chicano artists. The development of Goez was a vehicle which led to the events that took place in the East Los Angeles community related to the fine arts, such as, a personal invitation from Warner Buck, President-Producer of the First Home Show at the newly constructed Los Angeles Convention Center, to exhibit and demonstrate the production of fine arts works, by introducing five different artists every other day for the duration of the Home Show. Mr. Gonzalez was given 4 booths at which they were able to place the yet unfinished, first Chicano mural that lead to many that followed titled, “The Birth of Our Art”. The artists completed the piece in the presence of the audience attending this event before being installed on the Goez Art Studio façade. 18. Jose Luis stated, “One of the first Chicano murals, titled, ‘The Birth of Our Art’ was designed by my brother Juan Gonzalez and assisted in design by Robert Arenivar, Ignacio Gomez and David Botello. Since I had the experience in construction, installation and restoration, I was qualified as the Art Director and Project Director. The contributors to the execution and installation were: Gustavo Casillas, Richard Rueda, David Lopez, David Ramirez, Richard Rodriguez, Richard Haro, Richard Jimenez, Manuel Venegas, and Danny Gaytan. The mural was completed and installed at the Goez Art Studio and Gallery on First Street, in East Los Angeles, CA in 1971, covering the entire front of Goez Art Studio and Gallery. It was the first exterior Chicano mural in East Los Angeles to receive national acclaim. With this mural, my intention was to encourage and teach other artists to participate in the event of painting murals as the movement that would spread throughout our nation. I decided on using marine plywood sealed and treated for external use and painted with enamels for external durability which was the only available means at their humble beginning. The mural represents the joining of Indian and Spanish cultures to form today’s Chicano and his art experience. The figures of La Malinche and Cortez, are reaching out from their respective worlds, casting the seeds of their art down into the East Los Angeles community. From these seeds, the plant of fine art grows, and its roots are represented wrapping on our world that is being held by the claw which has a firm grip in our community. From the roots, the plant of fine arts encircles the United States… a statement of the future goals GOEZ has for Chicano art. But GOEZ is finding these goals choked by commercialism as represented by the fist, clutching the dollar bill and strangling the plant’s growth. But despite commercialism, the plant is able to flower and the blossom which is GOEZ as symbolized by Quetzalcoatl, the feathered serpent of the Aztecs.” Refer to the UCLA Exhibit 2011 19. In July of 1971, Pepe Arciga from KWKW radio station invited Joe Gonzalez to do a mural at the station. It was titled, “The Awakening”. 20. For the benefit of and for cultural awareness of the community, in July of 1971, Goez artists; Robert Arenivar, John Gonzalez, and David Botello, under the instruction of Jose Luis Gonzalez and Olinto Marcucci Ramirez, designed and produced large heads made of fiberglass, representing important figures of the pre-Columbian era, such as the Eagle Knight of the Aztecs, the Toltec, and the Olmec. In May of 1972, these large figures were first displayed in front of the First Street Store located on First and Townsend Streets in East Los Angeles, California. The East Los Angeles Doctors Hospital on Whittier and Townsend purchased several heads to be used as planters, along with many other works of art by different artists. 21. In 1971, Goez created a marble statue, “El Creador Creado” by Marco, a travelling sculptor earning his keep while travelling from Spain to Brazil. Joe Gonzalez asked his mother-in-law to allow him to stay at her home until he made his way out towards the South. 22. In December 16, 1971, Goez Art Studio was commissioned to do a painted mural for the interior of the First Street Store, titled, “A Search for Identify” which showed a lot of different facial images of Mexican people showing the diversity of the peoples of Mexican heritage thus disputing the stereotypical Mexican look. Designed by Richard Jimenez of Goez Art Studio as the first commission by Bob Kemp owner of the First Street Store, the largest and busiest department store in East Los Angeles at the time. 23. Exhibit, Nosotros Show, Hollywood Bowl, Los Angeles 1972 24. In 1972, Goez created another mural at the Doctor’s Hospital, titled, “Search for Knowledge”. 25. Hancock Art Association invited Goez to exhibit at Museum of Science and Industry, Los Angeles 1973 26. Goez exhibited at the Ebell Theater Art Show, Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles 1973 27. In 1973, Jose Luis Gonzalez created his first airbrush mural titled, “Tiempo”. This mural is located on the Los Compadres Club wall on Hammel and Gage in East Los Angeles. Designed by Jose Luis Gonzalez and Robert Arenivar and painted by Jose Luis Gonzalez. 28. San Fernando Mission: Following the devastating 7.1 Sylmar Earthquake of 1971, having caused the building to be totally razed, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles commissioned Jose Luis Gonzalez, in 1974, to head the extensive restoration efforts of the valuable collection of hand carved wooden statues of the San Fernando Mission and the re-creation of the art on the walls and beams in the interior of the mission that had been painted by the Indians in 1797. This required mathematics and art, because the architects only provided black and white, 8” by 10” photos for Jose Luis to refer to, so he had to invert and calculate the scale and the size that each design had to be produced. Jose Luis explained that he would calculate the dimension of the area that he was working on, and if it was 1/16 of an inch is to 10 inches as x is to 30 feet. He used this proportion throughout the entire Mission. The statues that he restored were hand carved in Spain, and they were made of oak, which is hard wood, so he purchased strips of oak wood to fill in the areas in each statue that needed filling in the cracks. He, then, took on the tedious task of drawing all of the art work that was created by the Indians in 1797, and mixed the colors so that the artists that were assisting him would follow his design. This project took three months to complete. 29. In May of 1974, Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned by the Music Center to design and execute 23 large banners 28ft. high by 6ft. wide for the 1974 Cinco de Mayo Celebration. The banners were painted utilizing a technique developed by Jose Luis Gonzalez, airbrushing using only four colors which enabled him to paint one massive banner each day. The complexity of the production of these banners were such that because the banners were 28’ high they needed to be painted sideways, stapling the canvas to the stretcher bar, applying the gesso to prepare the canvas for painting, drawing the design and painting it and completing it all in one day. These step were duplicated 23 days, consecutively. These banners were produced by Project Director, Jose Luis Gonzalez, designed by Robert Arenivar, assisted by John Gonzalez and David Botello and painted by Jose Luis Gonzalez. 30. First Street Store: One of Goez’ finest murals is at the First Street Store, 3640 E. First Street, Los Angeles CA, titled, “A History of Our Struggle”, was commissioned by Robert Kemp owner/general manager of the First Street Store. This transpired in early 1974. Mr. Gonzalez’s wife, Blanca Rosa, worked at First Street Store. This work traces the history of Chicano growth in a series of 19 murals. Glazed on ceramic tile, amounting to 1,123 square feet total; 17 of the murals were designed by Robert Arenivar with the contribution of Jose Luis Gonzalez as project director, art director and historian, and Juan Gonzalez, and David Botello, while the two center panels were designed by David Botello. As Jose Luis describes, the theme concentrates on the history of our ancestor’s struggle for survival. From small beginnings our pre-Columbian predecessors attained a level of civilization which amazes the present generations especially in regards to their advancements in the arts and sciences. Soon after these nomadic tribes began to settle down and cultivate the land, as seen in the first panel when the construction of the pyramids show the beginnings of a civilized nation that will flourish with its dedication toward betterment. The arts and sciences developed and flourished with the progress of the civilized nations, as seen in the second panel where the creation of the calendar that is almost 99.9% accurate, and the amazing methods used to arrive to it by observing and studying the heavens. The third panel depicts the trail of terror the great nation of warriors, one of these, the Aztecs, terrorized their opponents with an awesome military structure made up of Eagle and Jaguar Knights who came to be feared by all. The arrival of Cortez (whom the Indians believed was the white god Quetzalcoatl) led to the destruction of life as they knew it, the introduction of Western civilization, and the enslavement of the Indian, the eradication of their codices and indoctrination of Christianity. The conquest by the Spanish over the Aztecs would not have come about, if it were not that other tribes sided with the Spaniards, plus they had the advantage of the horse and the sword. Mexico’s revolt against Spain brought our independence, which was followed by a devastating war with France and later an internal war for agrarian rights. The United States’ ambition to acquire more territory also prompted a series of wars with Mexico, shown in another panel is a young Mexican cadet that wrapped himself with the Mexican flag and hurtled himself from the top of El Castillo de Chapultepec rather than allowing the attackers to take that flag. The next panel shows that the Treaty of Hidalgo had no meaning, for the rights of the Mexican people have not been respected. The panel that follows depicts the roots that were formed by our ancestors with respect to mining, agriculture and the vaquero methodology that is in use today. The farm workers could not be forgotten, and on this scene, the chains that bind them are finally being cut to relieve them of the injustices and neglect that they have withstood from the day they started until their bodies tire and wither away. The panel that displays the imbalance on the scale tells of the false representation we are experiencing due to the lack of those that do not go out to vote, but choose instead to stay home and watch TV, or drink their beer and play. Men’s struggle with technology is the second to the last panel, which depicts the reality of the future production line being taken over by the robotics that are introduced to reduce manual labor. A hope for a brighter tomorrow is the last panel that depicts everything that has transpired in history has been rather dark and gloomy, and now we see the light shining on the right side of the panel as if to say that we see the light in the tunnel, and a woman is depicted expecting a new child that might be the beginning of a new era. The History of our Struggle emphasizes our pride in our heritage and the desire to strive for improvement through reforms in law and education in hopes of a brighter tomorrow. 31. Throughout the 1980’s, Jose Luis Gonzalez was Art Director for Domingos Alegres a program that was held weekly at the Belvedere Park in East Los Angeles, and sponsored by The East Los Angeles Community Union (TELACU), involving the participation of many famous performers, as free entertainment for the people of the East Los Angeles Community. Jose Luis Gonzalez would design, produce, and install the sets for the stage for the performance of each show, and strike the set after each event with the help of his wife, Blanca, and sons, Joe, Jr., Manny, and Arthur. 32. One of the most important contributions to the community was the creation of the first gallery museum type atmosphere where year-round tours of students from pre-school to university level were an ongoing activity, and the responsibility of giving Chicano artists international exposure through filming of community murals by a German and French film companies. Part of this international exposure was the invitation by the World Peace Congress, in 1974, to participate on the First Chicano Art Exhibit in Russia where works by two of our artists were purchased for the Pushkin Museum. 33. Jose Luis Gonzalez was elected Chairman for the Fine Arts Committee for the Music Center’s Cinco de Mayo Celebration for four consecutive years, starting in 1974, organized the largest conglomeration of Chicano artists ever assembled in one place for an art contest and show at the Music Center, the Paseo de Los Pobladores, Los Angeles where winners were bestowed major awards such as trips to Hawaii and other significant awards in various categories. 34. This mural titled, “The Future of Innocence ~ El Futuro de La Inocencia” was commissioned by the Smithsonian Institute for the American Folklife Festival in July, 1975 in Washington DC. The project was directed by Jose Luis Gonzalez, designed by Eddie Martinez, and assisted by Juan D. Gonzalez, Jacob Winstead Gutierrez, Robert Arenivar, and David Botello. The mural, which was 10’ by 30’ and painted on canvas, was designed and begun at Goez Art Studio in East Los Angeles, then taken to Washington DC where it was completed on site in the middle of the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial. At the end of the festival the mural toured to 29 states. 35. Jose Luis and his brother, Juan, were featured on the Dewar’s Profile which appeared in 24 national magazines and 62 newspapers in July of 1975. 36. Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned by P.J. Walker Construction Company to restore a large mural that was painted by Fletcher Martin during the W.P.A. period in 1938. Jose Luis was given 50 hours to restore the mural because the other construction trades had to come in to finish the entire restoration of the building. The project took place on August 20, 1975, at the San Pedro Post Office. 37. Jose Luis Gonzalez was invited by Los Angeles Commissioners of Public Works to join as member of the United States Hispanic Bi-centennial Cultural Committee for the city of Los Angeles and was elected to chair the Committee from 1975 to 1976. Jose Luis Gonzalez designed the logo for this Committee which graced all the presentations awarded and stationery and promotional materials. During this time, he planned and introduced a mural program that would involve 1,500 artists and 7,500 students in the production of murals throughout the city of Los Angeles and its surrounding communities. Initiating the program was the mural painted for the University of Southern California titled, “Ad Astra Per Aspera ~ Through Difficulty to the Stars”. The proposal was officially recorded in the Los Angeles records as a United States Bi-centennial project and was produced for the MECHA organization at the Mecha Building at USC. The mural was designed and executed by Robert Arenivar and Jose Luis Gonzalez and measured 16’ by 44’. This mural was destroyed to expand parking lot. This mural was completed on July 18, 1975. 38. Jose Luis Gonzalez has been featured in Who’s Who in American Art since 1976. 39. Scenic Artists union allowed GOEZ to paint the two actors of Chico and the Man Freddie Prinz and Jack Albertson in barrio art fashion for the intro to the show. 40. In the fall of 1976, the students of Mark Keppel High School’s, ToHMAS Club (To Help Mexican-American Students) in Alhambra, supported the commission of a mural painting. The mural entitled “The Cosmic Family,” has a dual theme - the importance of family and the brotherhood of men, and the binding symbolism of an Aztec Eagle knight which depicts the school mascot. It was painted on the stairway wall which adjoins the north and east wings of the main building. The purpose of the mural is to provide a lasting gift to the school and students, and to illustrate the unity of people and education. Jose Luis estimated that a similar mural commissioned by a private group would cost nearly $10,000. Robert Arenivar and Jose Luis Gonzalez donated their time to this project. The cost of the mural supplies was $1,150 which was raised by 25 to 30 ToHMAS Club members with bake sales, car washes and candy sales. Mr. Gonzalez said he was happy to paint the mural at the high school so students could see the progression of the art work and learn more about art as the artists lecture while they paint. He fervently believes that mural work not only beautifies the community, but establishes pride in people of all ages through depicting relevant topics. 41. GOEZ and its artists were recognized as very instrumental in the development of the mural movement throughout Southern California, in fact on one important occasion, 15 artists received a resolution that was passed by the Honorable Art Torres of the 56th Assembly District, and the Honorable Richard Alatorre 55th Assembly District declaring that April 25, 1976 would be recognized as “East Los Angeles Day”, in commemoration of the Chicano Mural Renaissance in the East Los Angeles community, depicting the pride, cultural awareness and the political and social expression of the area’s citizens and that “East Los Angeles Day” be dedicated to those muralists responsible for the creation of the murals that have enhanced the East Los Angeles community. Jose Luis received the first certificate that day, personally delivered by Grace Montañez Davis, Deputy Mayor for the City of Los Angeles, as acknowledgement for the “East Los Angeles Day” celebration. Mayor Tom Bradley’s certificate of appreciation was awarded for outstanding efforts and accomplishments which have benefitted the community particularly the City of Los Angeles and for community spirit and interest that helped make Los Angeles a better place in which to live for having greatly assisted the Mayor in conducting the affairs of the City. 42. Contracted by Raymond Girvigian F.A.I.A. Architect, to restore 1,500 different ceramic tiles and fixtures for the WorkmanTemple Home, a landmark in the City of Industry, 1976 43. On September 28, 1976, Jose Luis Gonzalez was appointed by the Los Angeles 200 Committee and Mayor Bradley as a representative of one of the 44 Founding Fathers for the City of Los Angeles. 44. A mural was painted at the offices of the East Los Angeles Tribune, at 1730 West Olympic Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90015, on September 24, 1977 by Robert Arenivar and Jose Luis Gonzalez 45. Joe Gonzalez won a statewide contest and was awarded the contract to paint a mural depicting “Employment through the Ages”, and was painted in the lobby of the EDD (Employment Development Department) Building under CETA on August 21, 1978. During the production of the mural six college students were taught the techniques of painting a mural directly on the wall. One of many on-the-job trainings that were provided by Goez. Location: 15th & Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 46. Commissioned to paint some murals for the inside of the Benjamin Franklin Public Library, Jose Luis Gonzalez decided to paint the four elements as described by Plato: air, fire, water, and earth. Each panel is 9ft. high by 7ft. wide and there are eight panels. Each element is comprised of two panels: the first panel depicting Plato’s explanation of the workings of nature; the second panel depicting the same element as described by another philosopher, Paracelsus, who populated these four elements with flesh and blood creatures to help explain the workings of nature in the 16th century. The mural is titled, “The Four Elements as Plato Saw Them” and were installed on March 30, 1978. The Benjamin Franklin Public Library is located at 2200 East First Street in East Los Angeles, California. 47. Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned to design and produce and install a ceramic tile mural, including a decorative feature designed for the uppermost area surrounding the building of the City Terrace Library in 1978. It was dedicated on March 25, 1979 and titled “Ofrenda Maya”- “Mayan Offering”. The City Terrace Library is located at 4025 City Terrace Drive, Los Angeles CA 90063. 48. On behalf of Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley’s Sister City Committee with Mexico City, Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned to design and present a special ceramic tile plaque. The plaque was presented to Mexico City’s Mayor, Professor Hank Gonzalez, at a gala City Hall ceremony in 1981 49. In 1980, Jose Luis Gonzalez opened another Goez Gallery in Disneyland’s Seaports of the Pacific, also to expose the works of the talented Chicano artists. 50. Jose Luis Gonzalez closed the doors at the gallery on First Street in 1981 and established a third Goez Art Studio and Gallery at TELACU Industrial Park, 1981 51. Established a fourth Goez gallery at Historic Olvera Street, #13, 1981 to 1988 52. Jose Luis Gonzalez assisted the office of Mayor Bradley and arranged an exhibit named “Imagenes de la Raza: Self Portrayals of Mexican-American Culture”, consisting of works by at least 40 artists for the Amerika Haus Berlin in conjunction with Horizonte’ 82 - 2nd Festival of World Cultures, Berlin, June-July 1982. This exhibit exemplified by samplings of some of the finest Chicano art works in various forms of paintings, films, sculpture, murals, graphics and literature collected from many of the area’s leading cultural institutions including the Bilingual Foundation of the Arts, NOSOTROS theatrical organization, Plaza de la Raza Cultural Center, Barrio Bilingual Communications, Caminos Magazine, Teatro Campesino, and the Goez Institute of Murals and Fine Arts brought hope that it will build new bridges of understanding and friendship between our two countries. 53. Jose Luis Gonzalez was asked by the president of The East Los Angeles Community Union (TELACU), Mr. David C. Lizzaraga, to design a ceramic tile mural for their new office building that had just been constructed. Because of the relationship that Jose Luis had with all the artists, he wanted to give 3 or 4 artists the opportunity to come up with the best design. Frank Martinez produced the design and Jose Luis executed and installed the mural measuring 3 stories high by 23 ft., and it is titled “Orgullo de Nuestra Herencia”, Pride of Our Heritage”. The mural was created with 3500 hand painted ceramic tiles and installed in 1983. 54. Jose Luis Gonzalez executed, transported and installed a large painting 10ft. high by 22ft. wide, designed by Eddie Martinez for the Clift Hotel in San Francisco on September 17, 1983. Production of the painting by JLG, Assisted by Gustavo Kasyas and Tony Ramirez. In the installation of this massive framed painting Jose Luis’s son, Joe, Jr. 55. Jose Luis Gonzalez designed and executed the Official Olympic Mural for the XXIII Olympiad (LAOOC) titled “Bienvenidos a la Ciudad de Nuestra Señora La Reina de Los Angeles de Porciuncula”, held in the City of Los Angeles, July of 1984. The mural is 45ft. high by 100ft. wide, located at Vermont and Leighton, across the street from the Los Angeles Coliseum. Assisting in this project were Robert Arenivar, his son, Manny Gonzalez, Bernie Granados, Javier Vargas, Armando De La Cruz, and Tony Ramirez. This project afforded the opportunity to invite 20 high school students to paint the lower portion, for their sake and safety. Joe Gonzalez was presented a certificate and a bronze medal for his contribution to the success of the 23rd Olympiad from President of the Olympic Committee, Peter Ueberroth, Paul Ziffren, and Harry L. Usher. 56. In September of 1984, Jose Luis Gonzalez started the design and directed the complete transformation of El Mercado de Los Angeles. He contacted his friend, Eddie Martinez, to help him in the preliminary design to create a market place and mall that is focused on the Mexican motif. Jose Luis transformed this building into an artistic showcase, adding beauty to the floors, walls, the exquisite beveled windows and stained glass, and overall environment with a Mexican theme, adding three large stages for daily performances, plus murals indoors and in the exterior with artistic designs throughout. The Mercado is located at the corner of First and Lorena in East Los Angeles, CA at 3425 E 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90063. This project has been ongoing since 1984. 57. In the mid 1980’s, Jose Luis Gonzalez designed and executed an 11’ high by 22’ wide ceramic tile mural for the interior main play room of the Salesian Boys and Girls Club in East Los Angeles, at 3218 Wabash Avenue, Los Angeles, CA. 58. Jose Luis Gonzalez constructed a large sign for the Linda Vista Community Hospital, August 1985. This site is located at 630 South Saint Louis Street, Los Angeles, CA 90023 59. May 25, 1986: Hands Across America Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned by the Coca Cola Company to produce a challenging and interesting artistic endeavor, consisting of painting a large map of the United States with people holding hands from the West coast to the East coast. The map was an actual reproduction of the logo for the Hands Across America benefit event that would take place as a publicity campaign and held at the parking lot of the Queen Mary at Long Beach, California. The program was staged on Sunday, May 25, 1986, involving approximately 6.5 million participants holding hands from California to New York. The entire project consisted of painting the map of the US large enough to have over 10,000 people standing within the map; the Coca Cola logo, 40ft. by 60ft. to be placed on the roof of the Queen Marry ticket office building; another painting 10ft. by 30ft. for the stage backdrop; and a 6ft. by over 100ft. sign saying “The Last Mile”. The total amount of drawing and painting was over 60,000 square feet and had to be completed in just seven days. Needless to say, they had to work day and night on the project. Jose Luis was the project and art director and was assisted by his three sons, Joe, Jr., Manuel, and Arthur Gonzalez, brother-in-law Armando Gaytan, Jose and Frank Cortez, Javier Quijas, Gustavo Kasyas, Gloria and Antonio. First, they drew the map of the United States on the entire parking lot and included the people holding hands across America, then they painted the area with red, white and blue plus gold around the perimeter of the United States. While some of them continued with the production of the map at Long Beach, others painted the Coca Cola sign, the stage backdrop on canvas, and the sign for “The Last Mile”, which consisted of stretching the canvas and applying gesso. Then, they aimed fans to speed dry the gesso before the drawing and the application of paint would start. The event turned out to be a beautiful occasion for on the map stood over 10,000 people holding balloons with the color each was standing on and at the signal from the blimp that was overhead everyone released their balloons causing an impression of the entire map floating. It was quite impressive and absolutely unforgettable to all those present. 60. Jose Luis Gonzalez was project director and head sculptor for the construction of a shrine for the seven foot tall marble statue of “La Virgen de Guadalupe – A Gift of Hope”, started October 16, 1987, designed by Eddie Martinez for the City of Hope’s Rose Garden in the City of Duarte California, and dedicated on May 17, 1989. A major contribution to the design was made by Gilbert Flores, landscape architect. As the statue weighed in at about 1 ton, it was a monumental task to install the statue on a stand that Joe designed strong enough to hold the weight and yet make the statue look as if it is floating. There was a star-studded opening with prayer blessing by Cardinal Roger Mahony of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. All this was completed and presented with the help of Joe’s father, Juan Salazar Gonzalez, wife, Blanca Gonzalez, son’s, Manny and Arthur Gonzalez, Eddie Martinez, Jr., Armando De La Cruz, and Javier Vargas. This site is located at 1500 East Duarte Rd, Duarte, CA 91010. 61. Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned to design, construct, produce, and decorate a restaurant in Pasadena, California, named Cuernavaca de Noche and completed on August 27, 1987. Unfortunately, this restaurant does not exist any longer. 62. From 1987 to 1988, Jose Luis Gonzalez served as an artistic consultant and contractor for the new Tamayo Restaurant, at the corner of Olympic and Goodrich in East Los Angeles, in charge of importing all of the cantera stone and marble from Mexico, plus providing the art works by Maestro Rufino Tamayo. Jose Luis obtained permission from Maestro Tamayo, himself, the right to name the restaurant after him. Jose Luis gathered a great team to help him on this project comprised of his sons, Manny and Arthur Gonzalez, Danny Gaytan, Armando De La Cruz, and Javier Vargas. 63. Jose Luis Gonzalez restored a painting by Francisco de Zurbaran 1598-1664 completed in 1988 and designed the beautiful and intricate frame. 64. Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned by Time Magazine to design and execute a mural depicting actor Edward James Olmos for the front page of the magazine published July 11, 1988 called Magnifico. 65. On November 20, 1988, Jose Luis Gonzalez designed, produced and installed a ceramic tile mural at Don Bosco Technical Institute the school he graduated from in 1959. 66. Jose Luis Gonzalez was invited to hold a one-man exhibit at the Fresno Art Museum, in Fresno California, starting on August 29, 1990 at which time his close family attended. 67. Jose Luis Gonzalez restored the Altar at the Old Assumption Catholic Church located on Fresno, near Cesar Chavez (Brooklyn Avenue) August 1, 1991. 68. Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned to design, produce, import, install and decorate Camacho’s Cantina an exclusive restaurant at Universal Studios City Walk, 1000 Universal Center Drive #133, Universal City, CA 91608. Jose Luis Gonzalez contacted Eddie Martinez to help him with the design. This project started on May 8, 1992 and ended May 5, 1993. As this was a monumental project, Joe assembled a team comprised of his sons, Joe, Jr., Manny and Arthur Gonzalez, Danny Gaytan, Randy and Sergio Holguin, Armando De La Cruz, Carlos Barrios and Javier Vargas. 69. April 2, 1994, Jose Luis Gonzalez and Frank Martinez painted a very large mural about the history of California at the building of Al Jabal on the Camino Real in San Fernando Road. 70. November 25, 1994, Jose Luis Gonzalez designed and painted the entire exterior of San Francisco Catholic Church located at 4800 E. Olympic Blvd in East Los Angeles, CA, 90022. This project included patching up the cracks on the walls of the church and priming the surface. Jose Luis painted a large mural, with the assistance of Tony Ramirez, on the wall of a store that faces the parking lot of the church. The painting of the building had been completed before the mural. Shortly afterward, Father commissioned Jose Luis to design, execute and install a large 8’ tall stained glass window for the front of the church which was installed over the front entrance in the area of the choir loft. 71. From December 28, 1994 through April 28, 1995, Jose Luis Gonzalez restored all brick work interior and exterior of Lorne Green’s house in Santa Monica, California. 72. On July 31, 1995, Jose Luis Gonzalez completed a 10’ x 40’ mural depicting the Crucifixion in the church auditorium and windows were done imitation stained glass at Talpa Church in Los Angeles, California. Javier Vargas and Tony Ramirez assisted. 73. On April 26, 1999 Jose Luis Gonzalez worked on a few street signs for the City of La Verne and a ceramic mural for a bank concluding on May 19, 2003. 74. Jose Luis Gonzalez completed a ceramic tile mural inside the Renaker Klockgether Mortuary in Buena Park, California on July 11, 1999. 75. On August 16, 1999 Jose Luis Gonzalez completed a mural for the City of San Fernando on an arch welcoming visitors to San Fernando. 76. About the year 2000, at St. Elisabeth Catholic Church located at 14655 Kittridge St, in Van Nuys, CA 91405, Jose Luis Gonzalez produced and installed two ceramic tile murals, approximately 6’ tall, designed by Lalo Garcia. 77. In January of 2000, Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned to design execute and install a 10ft. high by 14ft. wide ceramic tile mural for the Sky Harbor Air Port in Phoenix Arizona, titled “A Bit of the Grand 48th” with Frank Martinez and Tony Ramirez. 78. Buena Park Lumber Company April 27, 2001, restored large wood relief. 79. La Feria Restaurant in Inglewood, CA January 28, 2003, designed and produced a ceramic tile and cantera stone mural for the entry. 80. On October 14, 2004, Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned by CVS Pharmacy to design and produce three ceramic tile murals for the Pharmacy in the City of Azusa, California, completed on August 30, 2005. This is located on Arrow Highway in Azusa. 81. Jose Luis Gonzalez received the KCET and Union Bank of California, Local Hero of the Year Award, September 14, 2007. 82. Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned to design and produce the “Wall of Honor”, which is part of the Eugene A. Obregon Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial that was dedicated on Saturday, December 5, 2009 at the Father Serra Park, Los Angeles California and contains the names of 3,456 recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor, from the Civil War to the recent conflict. 83. Jose Luis Gonzalez was commissioned to design and produce a large ceramic tile mural for the new Lizarraga Family lobby, of the White Memorial Hospital, titled “Do Not Fear for I Am Here”, dedicated on April 20, 2010 and the size is 8 ft. high by 33 ft. wide. 84. After having received a sizable grant from the Getty Foundation, UCLA performed a study as to which artists and artist organizations existed from 1945 through 1980. The discovery was made that Goez Art Studio was the very first Chicano arts organization that was developed to promote the work of Chicano artists. After which UCLA sponsored a great exhibition at the UCLA Fowler Museum putting emphasis on Goez Art Studio, titled, Mapping Another L.A.: The Chicano Art Movement from October 16, 2011 through February 26, 2012. d 85. In 2011, Jose Luis designed and produce a Ceramic tile Virgen de Guadalupe, 6’ tall, at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church, located at 4245 Acacia Av, Pico Rivera, CA 90660. 86. Jose Luis Gonzalez has a monument in the works now, to be dedicated soon after obtaining permits for construction at El Mercado de Los Angeles on First and Lorena in East Los Angeles, CA. The monument is in honor of the 201 Squadron, the pilots that fought in the Philippines against the Japanese during WWII, the monument will be 16 ft. tall by 25 ft. wide and 6 ft. deep. 87. Jose Luis Gonzalez has been commissioned to design and produce a large mosaic mural titled “Omenaje a La Mujer Mexicana” that will be installed at El Mercado de Los Angeles and will be 16 ft. tall by 32 ft. wide, and is currently in the designing stage.

Notes:

1. from UCLA book 2. News papers & Magazines: 3. Eastside Sun, “Memorial Medical Center’s Goal to be More than Just a Hospital” 4. Mechicano Art Center relocated to ELA in spring 1971 see ecology and art join forces. ELA Brooklyn-Belvedere Comet June 24, 1971 5. Busy Creations Los Angeles Sun July 18, 1971 6. Established a second Goez gallery at Disneyland, Seaports of the Pacific, 1980 7. Established a third Goez Art Studio and Gallery at TELACU Industrial Park, 1981 8. Established a fourth Goez gallery at Olvera Street, 1981

References:

1. First time in the news May 1975 Mary’s Hour, The Tidings, Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles 2. Ecology And Art Join Forces June 24, 1971, 319 North Soto Street, Los Angeles CA 3. Los Angeles Sun, Sunday, July 18, 1971, Busy Creations 4. Eastside Sun, July 22, 1971, Loyola Students Visit Art Gallery 5. La Opinion, Wednesday, September 22, 1971, Editorial Page/Pagina Editorial, Tribuna Del Publico by Luis B. Romero 6. Brooklyn Belvedere Comet, City Terrace Comet, Eastside Sun, Los Angeles Sun, Mexican American Sun, Sunday, December 5, 1971, Goez Art Gallery Interior 7. Hoovers Guide to Galleries, East Los Angeles, page 116/117, 1971 8. La Opinion, Sunday, July 25, 1971, Explicando los Motivos Foto de Pancho Hollywood para La Opinion 9. Eastside Sun, Sunday, December 5, 1971, Latin Art Exhibit Set Today at Goez Center 10. Belvedere Citizen, Showing large Toltec, Aztec and Olmec heads sculptures 11. Eastside Journal, Thursday, December 16, 1971, Mural Depicts History of Mexican Americans (Search for Identity) 12. The American Baptist Magazine, February, 1972, Art Center for East Los Angeles, showing nail relief to David Luna 13. Sam Kushner, August 23, 1974, It Was A Meat Market In East Los Angeles 14. Belvedere Citizen, Thursday, December 20, 1973, First Street Store to Remodel Front of Building 15. Bibliography: Jose Luis Ruiz (author), Action Chicano, TV Film Spec. 1974 16. Eastside Sun, Thursday, October 3, 1974, Salesian High “Mustang Mural” Creation of alums Juan Gonzalez and Robert Arenivar 17. Times Photo by Bruce Cox, Ceremony Dancers Perform in front of Salesian Mural during Dedication 18. Los Angeles Times, Thursday, December 26, 1974, Chicano Art Blooms in Barrio Warehouse by Joe R. Nevarez, Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times 19. Dewar’s Profile, numerous national magazines and newspapers 1975 20. La Opinion, Tuesday, January 21, 1975, Instantaneas by Octavio R. Costa 21. Belvedere Citizen, Thursday, March 6, 1975, Sassoon Hair Style Debuts in East Los Angeles 22. Mexican American Sun, Thursday, March 13, 1975, New Styles Introduced in East Los Angeles 23. Ralph P. Davidson (author), The Mural Message, Time Magazine 4/7/75 24. Mexican American Sun, Thursday, April 17, 1975, Sassoon to Award Scholarships 25. The Daily News, May 13, 1975, Chicano Muralist Will Speak at Whittier Library Friday 26. Eastside Journal and Belvedere Citizen, Thursday, May 15, 1975, Hispanic Women’s Council “Fashion Frolic Sunday” 27. Daily Trojan, Thursday, May 15, 1975, Chicano Center Mural Previews Bicentennial 28. Los Angeles Times, Sunday, June 29, 1975, Matter of Heritage Photo by Marilynn K. Yee 29. Los Angeles Herald-Examiner, Saturday, July 19, 1975, USC Gets 50 Foot Wall Art 30. News Pilot San Pedro, California, Wednesday, August 20, 1975, Staff Photos Restoration of San Pedro Post Office, Mural by Fletcher Martin 31. Belvedere Citizen, Thursday, August 21, 1975, Tour Art Gallery 32. Eastside Journal and Belvedere Citizen, Thursday, January 1, 1976, The History of Goez, TELACU award honors Goez Art Gallery by Lorraine Panicacci 33. Fenix en Los Angeles, article and photographs by Frank Schreider 34. The Washington Post, Style People/Entertainment/Leisure, Saturday, July 5, 1975, The Other California by Pam Lambert 35. Maldef Images of the Mexican American displayed at “Espejo” Photo Exhibit January 15 – February 25, 1975 36. Monterey Park Progress, June 25, 1975, Gallery Glances by Gale Hunt, Eddie Martinez one-man show June 8th – July 6th, 1975 37. Los Angeles East Magazine, September 11, 1975, Murals Set The Tone Of Life For Estrada Courts Residents 38. Los Angeles Times Home Magazine, April 11, 1976, Murals at Estrada Courts 39. The Mural Message Environment, May 5, 1976 40. The Murals of East Los Angeles by George Beronius, abridged from Home Magazine, Photo by Susan Giuliano 41. La Luz, September-October, 1975, A profile of an Hispanic Artist, Charlie “Clavos” Felix by Louis R. Torres, Photos by Frank Kawan 42. The Tidings Los Angeles, November 19, 1976, “The Short Life of Alfonso Fulano”, executed at the then Brooklyn Avenue Neighborhood Center at the corner of Cesar Chavez and Arizona, 4716 Cesar Chavez Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 43. The Herald Examiner, Cinco de Mayo, Putting the French on the Run by Ava Gutierrez-O’Neill, Staff Writer, April 28, 1974 44. Eastside Journal and Belvedere Citizen, Wednesday, March 17, 1976 45. Rosemead; South San Gabriel, California; Alhambra, California; Monterey Park, California; East Los Angeles Tribune; Commerce Tribune, Thursday, November 6, 1975, TO HMAS donates mural to school district, which was executed at Mark Keppel High School, 501 E Hellman Ave, Alhambra, CA 91801 46. La Opinion, Monday, December 13, 1976, Instantaneas by Octavio R. Costa, El Mundo Pictorico de Carlos Bueno 47. East Los Angeles Tribune, 1977, Photo by Steve Castro 48. El Sereno Star, September 6, 1978, Los Angeles Mural Exhibit Opens at Gallery, The Walls of East Los Angeles 49. Los Angeles Times, Thursday, September 7, 1978, Family Guide to Weekend Events, “Walls of East Los Angeles” 50. Monterey Park Comet and Montebello Comet, Thursday, August 9, 1979, Art for Health 51. East Los Angeles Gazette, Montebello, CA, Saturday, September 24, 1977, Murals, Goez Murals Respected Nationwide 52. “Tiempo” Mural with spray gun on Hammel & Gage, East Los Angeles 53. Calendar Art, Photography “The State of the Art” by William Wilson, Sunday, January 28, 1979, Espejo: Reflections of the Mexican American 54. The Montebello News, Saturday, May 1, 1976, at County Mall, Goez Featured in Weekend Show 55. The Christian Science Monitor, Friday, July 6, 1979, by Mark Sevens, Art Flows from Chicano Barrios 56. Montebello News, East Los Angeles Gazette, Pico Rivera News, August 1979, Goez Art Studios and Gallery KO’s Doubters by John Haeckl 57. Career World, December 1975, The Opening Door, Photo by Connie Parva, Times are Changing, New Career Doors are Opening 58. Goez: A New Face, A New Place by Pete Moraga, Jr. 59. It’s Gone From A Meat Packing House to a Museum by Earl Weaver, 1984 60. Camino, October 1981, Business, Art is Business, El Arte Como Negocio, An Interview with Joe L. Gonzalez by Katherine A. Diaz 61. Joe Gonzalez: The Man Behind Goez Art Gallery by Gloria Gonzalez 1979 62. Belvedere Citizen, Wednesday, April 2, 1980, Visit Art Gallery, Photo by Charles Calderon, Governor Bruce Bobbit of Arizona visits Goez with David Lizarraga 63. Art Work on Display, Tribune Mural Required Hard Work and Patience 1977 64. Papers from Oxnard and Ventura published story on 1981 Seven Up Impulsa a Artistas Mexicanos fotos y texto: Miguel Marquez 65. East Los Angeles Comet, Thursday, December 11, 1980, A Holiday Surprise from 7Up 66. Neighborhood News, Wednesday, December 17, 1980, Orange County, California: A Holiday Surprise from Seven Up 67. Misc: Brooklyn Avenue Neighborhood Center murals (talks about “La Vida Breve de Alfonso Fulano” 68. Misc: Talks about Portrait of Artist, Frank Martinez (Photo Exhibit) 69. Misc: Talks about Photo Exhibit now at Goez Gallery Images of Mexican American culture 70. Misc: Cinco de Mayo Celebrations 71. Misc: Goez Art Gallery brings “Chicano Art” to Olvera Street 72. Misc: Gallery displays “Walls of ELA” a photographic collection of 39 Community Murals 73. Misc: Photo on display, This picture of Bert Corona, ELA Activist 74. Misc: Art Galeria Goez by Rosemary Quesada Weiner, about new Gallery on Olvera Street 75. Misc: Description of “The Goez Mayan Birth Glyph Developed at Goez Art Studio” 76. TELACU Today, The East Los Angeles Community Union, January 1979, Goez Designed front page cover Christmas design 77. Caminos, October 1980 by Kathy L. Bixler-Valdez, 10 Hints in Buying Chicano and Mexican Art 78. Map of Southern California for Atlantic Richfield Company Depicts Goez and El Mercado 79. Press Release from Ray Gonzalez of Minority Department – KTLA about Joe and John on “Pacesetters” program Sunday, November 10, 1974 80. Press Release for Art Exhibit in Century City 81. Vida en el Valle, Fresno, CA, Wednesday, August 29, 1990, Artista Viene a Fresno / A $175,000 Salute Planned by Juan Loera 82. Vida en el Valle, Fresno, CA, Wednesday, December 5, 1990, “Muralista Presenta Sus Obras en Fresno / Muralist to Present Model of Monument”

In this reference, LACounty Art Commission incorrectly excluded JLGonzalez of heading this restoration project.[2]

References

External Links

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