Teleios

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This article needs additional references for verification. Please help[0] improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material will not be challenged and removed. (June 2016)

Template:Underlinked Teleios, Inc. is a private research foundation that uses the scientific method to evaluate the benefit of a Biblically-based lifestyle. Teleios, Inc. conducts its research using prospective clinical research, surveys and reviews of the medical literature.

The principal science-based findings derived from Teleios research indicate that "adherence to the Christian faith (i.e., confidence in salvation by faith as well as ongoing prayer, fellowship, service, obtaining biblical knowledge and praise), Biblical principles for daily life and participating in traditional societal institutions, enhance wellbeing in both healthy individuals and those afflicted by sickness”.[1]

History

First world culture has strong Christian historical roots that have continued influence at some level depending on the country. However, over the past century growing secularization generally has ingrained humanistic thought in first world culture.

As a result, many Christians feel inadequate or guilty in the face of humanistic thought.[1] This may be in part because of humanism’s emphasis of accepting all religious beliefs as long as religion does not supersede man's own ability to decide for themselves their own moral direction ref. Therefore, many Christians lack complete confidence in their own faith ref. Teleios seeks to determine if the Bible is a trustworthy guidebook for life using the scientific method.

Research Methods

The primary measure Teleios uses to assess Bible precepts is ‘wellbeing’. This is a scientific term found in the clinical literature, but not a biblical term. However, a number of surrogate markers for wellbeing are mentioned in the Bible such as contentment, forgiveness, thankfulness and joy.,,,[2][3][4][5][6][7]

Teleios uses several study designs to derive their data including: • Prospective, interventional, double-masked randomized trials. • Cross-sectional surveys. • Reviews of the peer-reviewed medical literature.

Results

Wellbeing – healthy populations

Prior data had noted that practice of Christianity benefits wellbeing generally, but also specifically by lessening: depression, anxiety/stress, trouble sleeping and family problems.,,,,[8][9][10][11][12][13][14] Teleios research has demonstrated the more a person practices the basic tenants of Christianity the greater the benefit to wellbeing. Basic Biblical principles used as measures of adherence in Teleios studies were (from Acts 2:42,47):,[15][16] • Church attendance (praise, fellowship) • Prayer • Service/outreach • Bible study • Bible knowledge

In addition, knowledge of basic truths in the Bible can add confidence in person’s faith and so improve wellbeing. Teleios sponsored studies have noted that Christians who are secure in their salvation have better wellbeing and less guilt.,[15][16]

Wellbeing - medically ill

Practice of Christianity also benefits patients with long term illness. Many medical articles indicate that Christian belief and practice may help patients in the following areas:,[7][17] • Improves patient’s general wellbeing. • Improves socialization. • Improves treatment adherence and knowledge of disease. • Prayer may help healing especially in non-cardiac disease. • Positive coping mechanism.

These improvements derived especially from individual prayer, interventional prayer from others, church attendance and associated socialization. However, with cardiovascular disease the influence of prayer on the disease process itself is inconsistent,[18][19] but appear beneficial in other disease states including: ocular disease,[20] diabetes,[21] cancer,[22] brain injury,[23] in vitro fertilization.[24]

Wellbeing - trends

Personal characteristics, encouraged in the Bible, evaluated in peer-reviewed medical literature also are associated with improved wellbeing when present in a person’s.[7] They include the following: • Forgiveness • Thankfulness • Hope • Empathy • Peace • Joy These parameters may benefit not just general wellbeing, but also interpersonal relationships and physical health.

Further, prior research has shown that participation in biblically supported Institutions is associated with enhance wellbeing. • Church attendance and associated socialization.,[15][16] • Traditional man/woman marriage. This institution assets wellbeing by means of improved physical/mental health, sexual satisfaction, family income and the happiness of children.

Conclusion

Recent medical research has shown that the practice of Christianity improves wellbeing as well as surrogate markers for wellbeing such as joy and peace. These findings have been shown in healthy populations and those with medical illnesses. In addition, the Teleios Foundation has noted through their research that the greater the daily adherence to biblical principles, as well as basic knowledge of the faith and security in their salvation, further enhances wellbeing.

Bibliography

  • Stewart WC, Sharpe ED, Kristoffersen CJ, Nelson LA, Stewart JA. Association of strength of religious adherence to attitudes regarding glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Ophthalmic Res 2011:45:53-6.
  • Stewart WC, Adams MP, Stewart JA, Nelson LA. Review of clinical medicine and religious practice. J Relig Health Mar 2013;52:91-106.
  • MacIlvaine WR, Stewart WC. The apologetic value of religion and wellness studies. Christian Apologetics Journal 2013;11:65-83.
  • Dehning DO, Nelson LA, Stewart JA, Stewart WC. Does religious adherence help diabetic patients' well-being? J Christian Nurs 2013;30:e1-11.
  • MacIlvaine WR, Nelson LA, Stewart JA, Stewart WC. Association of strength of religious adherence to quality of life measures. Complement Ther Clin Pract 2013;19:251-255.
  • MacIlvaine WR, Nelson LA, Stewart JA, Stewart WC. Association of strength of community service to personal wellbeing. Community Ment Health J 2014; 50:577-582.
  • Stewart WC, Reynolds KE, Jones LJ, Stewart JA, Nelson LA. The source and impact of specific parameters that enhance well-being in daily life. J Rel Health 2016;55:1326-1335.
  • Stewart WC, Nelson LA, Stewart JA. Is there room for God in the exam room? Review Ophthalmol April 2016;60-64.
  • Hamilton JB, Moore AD, Johnson KA, Koenig HG. Reading the Bible for guidance, comfort, and strength during stressful life events. Nurs Res. 2013 May-Jun;62(3):178-84. doi: 10.1097/NNR.0b013e31828fc816
  • Krause N. Gratitude toward God, stress, and health in late life. Res Aging 2006;28:163-183. doi: 10.1177/0164027505284048
  • Paukert, A.L., Phillips, L., Cully, J.A., Loboprabhu, S.M., Lomax, J.W., Stanley, M.A. Integration of religion into cognitive-behavioral therapy for geriatric anxiety and depression. J Psychiatr Pract 2009;15:103-112. doi: 10.1097/01.pra.0000348363.88676.4d
  • Berry, D. (2002). Does religious psychotherapy improve anxiety and depression in religious adults? A review of randomized controlled studies. Int J Psychiatr Nurs Res, 8, 875-890. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12448875
  • Allen, R.S., Phillips, L.L., Roff, L., Cavanaugh, R., & Day, L. (2008). Religiousness/spirituality and mental health among older male inmates. Gerontologist, 48, 692-697. doi: 10.1093/geront/48.5.692
  • Papazisis, G., Nicolaou, P., Tsiga, E., Christoforou, T., Sapountzi-Krepia, D. (2014). Religious and spiritual beliefs, self-esteem, anxiety, and depression among nursing students. Nurs Health Sci, 16, 232-238. doi: 10.1111/nhs.12093
  • Mann, J.R., McKeown, R.E., Bacon, J., Vesselinov, R., & Bush, F. (2008). Religiosity, spirituality and antenatal anxiety in Southern U.S. women. Arch Womens Ment Health, 11, 19-26. doi: 10.1007/s00737-008-0218-z
  • Blumenthal, J., Babyak, M., Ironson, G., Thoresen, C., Powell, L., Czajkowski, S., et al. (2007). Spirituality, religion, and clinical outcomes in patients recovering from an acute myocardial infarction. Psychosomatic Medicine, 69, 501-508.
  • Feinstein, M., Liu, K., Ning, H., Fitchett, G., & Lloyd-Jones, D. (2010). Burden of cardiovascular risk factors, subclinical atherosclerosis, and incident cardiovascular events across dimensions of religiosity: The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. Circulation, 121, 659-666.
  • Rausch, S., Winegardner, F., Kruk, K., Phatak, V., Wahner-Roedler, D., & Vincent, A. (2011). Complementary and alternative medicine: Use and disclosure in radiation oncology community practice. Support Care Cancer, 19, 521-529.
  • Vannemreddy, P., Bryan, K., & Nanda, A. (2009). Influence of prayer and prayer habits on outcome in patients with severe head injury. The American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care, 26, 264-269.
  • Cha, K., & Wirth, D. (2001). Does prayer influence the success of in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer? Report of a masked, randomized trial. Journal of Reproductive Medicine, 46, 781-787.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Teleios, Inc. - Establishing evidence for the positive results of a God-based lifestyle". http://teleiosresearch.com/. 
  2. Emmons RA, McCullough ME. Counting blessings versus burdens: an experimental investigation of gratitude and subjective well-being in daily life. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2003 Feb;84(2):377-89.
  3. Froh JJ, Sefick WJ, Emmons RA. Counting blessings in early adolescents: an experimental study of gratitude and subjective well-being. J Sch Psychol. 2008 Apr;46(2):213-33.
  4. Datu JAD. Forgiveness, gratitude and subjective well-being among Filipino adolescents. Int J Adv Counsel. 2014 Sep;36(3):262-73.
  5. Krause N, Ellison CG. Forgiveness by God, forgiveness of others, and psychological well-being in late life. J Sci Study Relig. 2003 Mar 1;42(1): 77–94.
  6. Otake K, Shimai S, Tanaka-Matsumi J, Otsui K, Fredrickson BL. Happy people become happier through kindness: A counting kindnesses intervention. J Happiness Stud. 2006 Sep;7(3):361-75.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 Stewart WC, Reynolds KE, Jones LJ, Stewart JA, Nelson LA. The source and impact of specific parameters that enhance well-being in daily life. J Rel Health 2016;55:1326-1335.
  8. Hamilton, Moore, Johnson, & Koenig, 2013
  9. Krause, 2006
  10. Paukert et al., 2008
  11. Berry, 2002
  12. Allen, Phillips, Roff, Cavanaugh, & Day, 2008
  13. Papazisis, Nicolaou, Tsiga, Christoforou, & Sapountzi-Krepia, 2014
  14. Mann, McKeown, Bacon, Vesselinov, & Bush, 2008
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 MacIlvaine, Stewart, et al. Association of strength of community service to personal wellbeing. Community Ment Health J 2014; 50:577-82.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 MacIlvaine, Stewart, et al. Association of strength of religious adherence to quality of life measures. Complement Ther Clin Pract 2013;19:251-5.
  17. Stewart WC, Adams MP, Stewart JA, Nelson LA. Review of clinical medicine and religious practice. J Relig Health Mar 2013;52:91-106.
  18. Blumenthal et al. 2007
  19. Feinstein et al. 2010
  20. Stewart, et al. Association of strength of religious adherence to attitudes regarding glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Ophthalmic Res 2011:45:53-6
  21. Dehning, Stewart, et al. Does religious adherence help diabetic patients' well-being? J Christian Nurs 2013;30:e1-11.
  22. Rausch et al. 2011
  23. Vannemredd et al. 2009
  24. Cha and Wirth 2001
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