Victor Yoran

From Deletionpedia.org: a home for articles deleted from Wikipedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on March 30 2015. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Victor_Yoran. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Victor_Yoran, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Victor_Yoran. Purge

Wikipedia editors had multiple issues with this page:
The topic of this article may not meet Wikipedia's general notability guideline. But, that doesn't mean someone has to… establish notability by citing reliable secondary sources that are independent of the topic and provide significant coverage of it beyond its mere trivial mention. (December 2014)
The topic of this article may not meet Wikipedia's general notability guideline. But, that doesn't mean someone has to… establish notability by citing reliable secondary sources that are independent of the topic and provide significant coverage of it beyond its mere trivial mention. (April 2008)

Template:COI BLP sources

Victor Yoran is a Russian cellist,[1] with a recorded repertoire of Bach cello music.[2]

Life

He was born in Moscow, and attended the Central Music School there when he was six years old.[3]

He studied under Mstislav Rostropovich and in 1962 ended his studies as a runner-up prizewinner of the International Tchaikovsky Competition.[no citations needed here]

Playing career

Details in this section taken from self-published source:[1]

After studying, he went on extended tours through the Soviet Union, Romania and Bulgaria and gained distinction during the Prague Spring. In 1969 he illegally left the Soviet Union and first went to Israel. There he taught at the Rubin Academy of Music and conducted a chamber music orchestra. He played as a soloist in the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, playing among others cello concertos by Schumann, Lalo and Khachaturian.

From Israel, Yoran went on various concert tours to England, where together with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra he played with Dvořák's cello concerto.

Further tours, mainly with works for the solo cello, took Yoran to the United States of America (Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and New York) and to Norway.

In 1976, Yoran was engaged as first solo cellist by the Radio Symphony Orchestra of Frankfurt. [no citations needed here] With this orchestra he made a name for himself e.g. together with conductors such as Eliahu Inbal, Václav Neumann and Vladimir Ashkenazy, with whom he played the cello concertos of Honegger, Prokofiev, the double concerto of Brahms, as well as Shelomo of Bloch and Don Quixote of Richard Strauss.

Yoran presented his extensive chamber music repertoire in duo evenings with the pianist Irina Edelstein, as well as in numerous radio recordings. In 1992 he made a CD recording of Bach's six solo suites.

In 1993, Yoran returned to the country of his birth for the first time in 24 years. In St Petersburg he played with the equally highly individualistic pianist, Valery Afanassiev and the violinist Lydia Dubrovskaya during the festival of the "White Nights of St Petersburg".

The newspaper Berliner Tagesspiege wroteTemplate:Specify about Yoran's composition Duo for Violin and Tuba: "In order to perfectly reconcile these two contrary instruments, Yoran commands over "taste and great knowledge of the science of composition", to freely use the great words of Joseph Haydn about his colleague, Mozart".

In 2005, Yoran for the first time made cello recordings of the two violin works of Bach. He lives in Berlin.

Yoran plays an Italian instrument of Giovanni Grancino of the year 1700.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Victor-yoran.com English website
  2. Amazon CD listings
  3. Brasenose College, Oxford Music Concert notes 25 April 2010. Accessed 3 July 2010

External links

  • [1] Personal website