Difference between revisions of "Albert Bond Lambert House"

From Deletionpedia.org: a home for articles deleted from Wikipedia
Jump to: navigation, search
m (inclusion power)
m (inclusion power)
Line 7: Line 7:
 
In 1926, a young [[Charles Lindbergh]] visited this home while looking for financial support for his proposed transatlantic flight.  Lambert offered financial support to Lindbergh and encouraged others to do the same.  In return for this financial support, Lindbergh's plane was named ''[[The Spirit of St. Louis]]''.  Furthermore, [[St. Louis Lambert International Airport|St. Louis' Lambert Airport]] was later named after Albert Bond Lambert.
 
In 1926, a young [[Charles Lindbergh]] visited this home while looking for financial support for his proposed transatlantic flight.  Lambert offered financial support to Lindbergh and encouraged others to do the same.  In return for this financial support, Lindbergh's plane was named ''[[The Spirit of St. Louis]]''.  Furthermore, [[St. Louis Lambert International Airport|St. Louis' Lambert Airport]] was later named after Albert Bond Lambert.
  
The Albert Bond Lambert House is a red-brick and symmetrical mansion which has a two-story portico with columns.<ref>{{cite book | author = Nini Harris | year = 2018 | title = This Used to Be St. Louis | publisher = Reedy Press, LLC | location = St. Louis, MO | id = 9781681061139 | pages = 41-42}}</ref>  This almost 12,000 square foot Neoclassical-style home was designed by noted architect George W. Hellmuth and was built between 1902 and 1903.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://tedwight.typepad.com/st_louis_real_estate_blog/2008/05/2-hortense-plac.html|title=2 Hortense Place|accessdate=2019-12-27}}</ref>  It has 6 bedrooms and 8 bathrooms.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.estately.com/listings/info/2-hortense-place--1|title=2 Hortense Place St Louis, MO 63108 — Hortense, St Louis City County|accessdate=2019-12-27}}</ref>  This home was constructed just before the [[Louisiana Purchase Exposition|1904 World's Fair]].  Charles Lindbergh stayed at the house.  The King of Sweden also visited this house with the fireplace in the solarium apparently being a gift from the king.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://townandstyle.com/2-hortense-place-st-louis/|title=2 Hortense Place, St Louis|accessdate=2019-12-27}}</ref>  
+
The Albert Bond Lambert House is a red-brick and symmetrical mansion which has a two-story portico with columns.<ref>{{cite book | author = Nini Harris | year = 2018 | title = This Used to Be St. Louis | publisher = Reedy Press, LLC | location = St. Louis, MO | id = 9781681061139 | pages = 41–42}}</ref>  This almost 12,000 square foot Neoclassical-style home was designed by noted architect [[George W. Hellmuth]] and was built between 1902 and 1903.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://tedwight.typepad.com/st_louis_real_estate_blog/2008/05/2-hortense-plac.html|title=2 Hortense Place|accessdate=2019-12-27}}</ref>  It has 6 bedrooms and 8 bathrooms.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.estately.com/listings/info/2-hortense-place--1|title=2 Hortense Place St Louis, MO 63108 — Hortense, St Louis City County|accessdate=2019-12-27}}</ref>  Before construction, it's cost was estimated to be $45,000 ({{inflation|US|45,000|1902|fmt=eq}}).<ref>{{cite magazine|magazine=The American Architect and Building News|date=Nov 8, 1902|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=05AzAQAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA4|title=Building Intelligence}}</ref> This home was constructed just before the [[Louisiana Purchase Exposition|1904 World's Fair]].  Charles Lindbergh stayed at the house.  The King of Sweden also visited this house with the fireplace in the solarium apparently being a gift from the king.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://townandstyle.com/2-hortense-place-st-louis/|title=2 Hortense Place, St Louis|accessdate=2019-12-27}}</ref>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
 +
 +
[[Category:Buildings and structures in St. Louis]]
 +
  
 
{{Missouri-struct-stub}}
 
{{Missouri-struct-stub}}
 
[[Category:Buildings and structures in St. Louis]]
 

Revision as of 07:22, 16 January 2020

This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on January 13 2020. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Albert_Bond_Lambert_House. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Albert_Bond_Lambert_House, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Albert_Bond_Lambert_House. Purge

Albert Bond Lambert House (also known as 2 Hortense Place) is a home in St. Louis, Missouri that was owned by American aviation benefactor, pharmaceutical company heir, and Olympic golfer Albert Bond Lambert. One of Lambert's first flight instructors was Orville Wright.

In 1926, a young Charles Lindbergh visited this home while looking for financial support for his proposed transatlantic flight. Lambert offered financial support to Lindbergh and encouraged others to do the same. In return for this financial support, Lindbergh's plane was named The Spirit of St. Louis. Furthermore, St. Louis' Lambert Airport was later named after Albert Bond Lambert.

The Albert Bond Lambert House is a red-brick and symmetrical mansion which has a two-story portico with columns.[1] This almost 12,000 square foot Neoclassical-style home was designed by noted architect George W. Hellmuth and was built between 1902 and 1903.[2] It has 6 bedrooms and 8 bathrooms.[3] Before construction, it's cost was estimated to be $45,000 (Template:Inflation).[4] This home was constructed just before the 1904 World's Fair. Charles Lindbergh stayed at the house. The King of Sweden also visited this house with the fireplace in the solarium apparently being a gift from the king.[5]

References


Template:Missouri-struct-stub