Difference between revisions of "Amy Sequenzia"

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This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on February 29 2016. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Amy_Sequenzia. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Amy_Sequenzia, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Amy_Sequenzia. Purge

Template:Autism rights movement Amy Sequenzia is an American, non-speaking Autistic, multiply disabled activist and writer. Amy writes about disability rights, civil rights and human rights. She also has epilepsy, cerebral palsy, dyspraxia,[1] and insomnia.[2]

She is a co-editor of Typed Words, Loud Voices, a book about typed communication.[3] She is a frequent contributor to the Autism Women's Network[4] and Olibean.com.[5] She is also a board member of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network[6] and is on the board of directors at Florida Alliance for Assistive Services and Technology.[7] She also writes poetry.[8] Amy has presented in several conferences in the US and abroad, including the conference “Reclaiming our Bodies and Minds” at Ryerson University.[4] Her work is featured in books about being Autistic and Disabled.

In her own words: " I type to communicate. I began typing when I was eight years old, but for many years I did not type much because of seizures that made me very tired all the time, and because of lack of support. Today I cannot imagine being silenced again."[4]

Disability Rights and Autism Activism

Amy is deeply involved with the Neurodiversity Movement and has been outspoken about the rights and worth of disabled people. She criticizes the medical model of autism.[1][9] Sequenzia argues against attempts to cure autism, believing autism is an inseparable part of an autistic person's personhood. She supports all methods of communication a disabled person chooses to use and is a user of facilitated communication.[1][3][10] She supports attempts to cure epilepsy.[11][12]

Sequenzia uses identity-first language. She has written against the use of functioning labels as a person who is typically labeled "low-functioning."[13]

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "An Interview With Amy Sequenzia, a Non-Speaking Autistic Writer and Poet". http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ariane-zurcher/autism_b_1871276.html. Retrieved 2015-08-28. 
  2. "My Uncooperative Body". http://autismwomensnetwork.org/my-uncooperative-body/. Retrieved 2015-10-04. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Sequenzia, Amy; Elizabeth J., Grace; Yergeau, Melanie (2015). Typed Words, Loud Voices. Autonomous Press. pp. http://www.amazon.com/Typed-Words-Loud-Voices-Sequenzia/dp/0986183520. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 "Amy Sequenzia - Autism Women's Network" (in en-US). http://autismwomensnetwork.org/directory/amy-sequenzia/. 
  5. "Amy Sequenzia is a non-speaking Autistic, multiply disabled activist and writer. Amy writes about disability rights, civil rights and human rights. She also writes poetry. Amy has presented in several conferences in the US and abroad, and her work is featured in books about being Autistic and Disabled. Amy is deeply involved with the Neurodiversity Movement and has been outspoken about the rights and worthy of disabled people. Amy serves on the Board of Directors of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN), and the Florida Alliance for Assistive Services and Technology (FAAST). http://nonspeakingautisticspeaking.blogspot.com and Autism Women’s Network. You can also follow Amy on Twitter at @AmySequenzia.". http://ollibean.com/author/amy-sequenzia/. 
  6. "Leadership | Autistic Self Advocacy Network". http://autisticadvocacy.org/home/about-asan/leadership/. Retrieved 2015-12-26. 
  7. "BoardMembers | Florida Alliance for Assistive Services and Technology". http://www.faast.org/node/2448. 
  8. Sequenzia, Amy. "My Voice, My Life : A Poem by Amy Sequenzia". http://ollibean.com/2012/01/17/my-voice-my-life-a-poem-by-amy-sequenzia/. 
  9. Parker, Sydney. "Autism: does ABA therapy open society's doors to children, or impose conformity?". http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/mar/20/autism-does-aba-therapy-open-societys-doors-to-children-or-impose-conformity. Retrieved 2015-09-09. 
  10. "THINKING PERSON'S GUIDE TO AUTISM: Interview: Amy Sequenzia on Facilitated Communication". http://www.thinkingautismguide.com/2012/11/interview-amy-sequenzia-on-facilitated.html. Retrieved 2015-09-20. 
  11. "Celebrating My Life by Amy Sequenzia". http://ollibean.com/2015/04/17/celebrating-my-life/. Retrieved 2015-09-20. 
  12. "Pain in My Brain". http://ollibean.com/2013/03/28/pain-brain/. Retrieved 2015-09-20. 
  13. "An Interview With Amy Sequenzia, a Non-Speaking Autistic Writer and Poet". http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ariane-zurcher/autism_b_1871276.html. 


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