Amy Sequenzia

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This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on June 16 2019. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Amy_Sequenzia. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Amy_Sequenzia, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Amy_Sequenzia. Purge

Template:Use mdy dates Amy Sequenzia is an American non-verbal autistic prominent in the field of autism and disability activism. She is known for voluminous writings that are produced through facilitated communication and published under her name.[1]

Biography

Sequenzia was born in Miami and grew up in a community group home in St. Louis where there was a better special education program.Template:Sfn Sequenzia moved back to Florida in 2005.[2] She has cerebral palsy,[3] and is a member of the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network.[4] Writings and other commentary attributed to Sequenzia include poetry,[2] contributions to the book Loud Hands,Template:Sfn and a speech to the Florida Legislature on issues relating to health and people with disabilities.[5] In speaking panels, she uses a special iPad that "speaks" for her based on input typed by a facilitator.Template:Sfn

According to her facilitated communications, she self-identifies as a "non-speaking Autistic", preferring to use the capital letter as a mark of pride "because it is my identity and cannot be separated from me", and says she is "not ashamed" of her condition.[6] Additional statements have included telling parents not to try and "fix" their children, but to celebrate and endorse who they are so they will be "safe to live disabled",[7][8] and criticizing Temple Grandin for only focusing on and listening to high-functioning autistics.[9]

References

  1. Bakan, Michael B. (2018) (in en). Speaking for Ourselves: Conversations on Life, Music, and Autism. Oxford University Press. pp. 201–216. ISBN 9780190855833. https://books.google.com/books?id=gnpVDwAAQBAJ&pg=FA201. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 Corona, Laura (July 29, 2010). "CATA Poets Speak Their Minds Tonight". North Adams Transcript. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/33007543/. 
  3. Template:Cite magazine
  4. Korkiakangas, Terhi (May 30, 2018) (in en). Communication, Gaze and Autism: A Multimodal Interaction Perspective. Routledge. ISBN 9781317221258. https://books.google.com/books?id=KdtdDwAAQBAJ&lpg=PT238&dq=%22amy%20sequenzia%22&pg=PT238#v=onepage&q=%22amy%20sequenzia%22&f=false. 
  5. Berman, Dave (December 13, 2012). "Range of Issues Discussed". Florida Today. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/33007760/. 
  6. Parker, Sydney (March 20, 2015). "Autism: does ABA therapy open society's doors to children, or impose conformity?". The Guardian. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/mar/20/autism-does-aba-therapy-open-societys-doors-to-children-or-impose-conformity. Retrieved June 19, 2019. 
  7. "Disability rights and reproductive rights don't have to be in conflict". LA Times. August 29, 2016. https://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-perry-picciuto-disability-rights-abortion-zika-20160829-snap-story.html. Retrieved June 19, 2019. 
  8. Template:Cite magazine
  9. "Things You Should Never Say to An Autistic". San Francisco Chronicle. August 12, 2012. https://blog.sfgate.com/lshumaker/2012/08/12/15-things-you-should-never-say-to-an-autistic-by-lydia-brown/. Retrieved June 19, 2019. 

Sources

Template:Authority control


External link

  • Blog at Ollibean.com