Difference between revisions of "Connections-based learning"

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[[File:Connections-based Learning Infographic.png|alt=Connections-based Learning infographic|thumb|Connections-based Learning created by Sean Robinson | CBL infographic by Sean Robinson and Leigh Cassell]]
 
[[File:Connections-based Learning Infographic.png|alt=Connections-based Learning infographic|thumb|Connections-based Learning created by Sean Robinson | CBL infographic by Sean Robinson and Leigh Cassell]]
'''Connections-based learning''' ('''CBL''') is a pedagogical approach to education that uses online and offline connections with students, experts, organizations, the community,<ref>{{Cite web|url = https://www.foodbanking.org/students-citadel-middle-school-bake-difference|title = Students from Citadel Middle School Bake a Difference|last =|first =|date = January 17, 2014|website = The Global FoodBanking Network|publisher =|access-date = March 23, 2016}}</ref> and classrooms around the globe<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.connectionsbasedlearning.com/clp.html|title=Connected Learning Partnerships|last=|first=|date=April 1, 2016|website=Connections-based Learning|publisher=Sean Robinson|access-date=September 18, 2016}}</ref> to teach and to learn. CBL emphasizes contacting and interacting with others inside and outside the class giving students a "real-world" experience. CBL was created by teacher Sean Robinson.<ref>Jenkin, Matthew. (Dec. 2013). [https://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/teacher-blog/2013/dec/04/project-based-learning-teachers-twitter Project-based learning: the top teachers to follow on Twitter]. theguardian.com. Retrieved March 23, 2016.</ref><ref>{{Cite web|url=https://educationblog.microsoft.com/en-ca/2017/10/a-journey-into-space/|title=A Journey into Space|last=Robinson|first=Sean|date=December 4, 2016|website=Microsoft Education Blog|publisher=[[Microsoft]]|access-date=December 7, 2016}}</ref>
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'''Connections-based learning''' ('''CBL''') is a pedagogical approach to education that uses online and offline connections with students, experts, organizations, the community,<ref>{{Cite web|url = https://www.foodbanking.org/students-citadel-middle-school-bake-difference|title = Students from Citadel Middle School Bake a Difference|last = |first = |date = January 17, 2014|website = The Global FoodBanking Network|publisher = |access-date = March 23, 2016}}{{Dead link|date=January 2020 |bot=InternetArchiveBot |fix-attempted=yes }}</ref> and classrooms around the globe<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.connectionsbasedlearning.com/clp.html|title=Connected Learning Partnerships|last=|first=|date=April 1, 2016|website=Connections-based Learning|publisher=Sean Robinson|access-date=September 18, 2016}}</ref> to teach and to learn. CBL emphasizes contacting and interacting with others inside and outside the class giving students a "real-world" experience. CBL was created by teacher Sean Robinson.<ref>Jenkin, Matthew. (Dec. 2013). [https://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/teacher-blog/2013/dec/04/project-based-learning-teachers-twitter Project-based learning: the top teachers to follow on Twitter]. theguardian.com. Retrieved March 23, 2016.</ref><ref>{{Cite web|url=https://educationblog.microsoft.com/en-ca/2017/10/a-journey-into-space/|title=A Journey into Space|last=Robinson|first=Sean|date=December 4, 2016|website=Microsoft Education Blog|publisher=[[Microsoft]]|access-date=December 7, 2016}}</ref>
  
 
== Contrast with other approaches ==
 
== Contrast with other approaches ==
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Connections-based learning has three major elements<ref>{{Cite web|url = http://www.connectionsbasedlearning.com/|title = Connections-based Learning|website = connections-basedlearning.com|accessdate = 2015-12-27}}</ref> which guide this way of seeing teaching and learning:
 
Connections-based learning has three major elements<ref>{{Cite web|url = http://www.connectionsbasedlearning.com/|title = Connections-based Learning|website = connections-basedlearning.com|accessdate = 2015-12-27}}</ref> which guide this way of seeing teaching and learning:
 
# Connection lens{{snd}} This is the ''who'' of CBL. The lens focuses the class on finding a learning partner with whom to work. These partners could include a person or group in the local community, an expert in a certain field, an organization that can be supported, or another classroom, either local or global, with whom to work.
 
# Connection lens{{snd}} This is the ''who'' of CBL. The lens focuses the class on finding a learning partner with whom to work. These partners could include a person or group in the local community, an expert in a certain field, an organization that can be supported, or another classroom, either local or global, with whom to work.
# Collaboration lens{{snd}} This is the ''what'' of CBL. It includes a design of activities that emphasizes looking at local and global needs, building an empathetic desire to help, co-constructing learning goals with teacher and student, and making a plan of action. Students are given the opportunity to create a response to the interaction. They develop the skills needed to address what was found in the interaction.<ref>{{Cite book|title=Connections-based Learning|last=Robinson|first=Sean|publisher=Connections-based Learning|year=2017|isbn=978-1-7751843-1-7|location=Port Coquitlam|pages=76}}</ref> Students critically examine theirs' and others' possible solutions. Innovation is encouraged as students address the need. Those involved honor the connection and document their growth while the process is shared out to elicit feedback. Students use their growing network to further their learning. They respond to and reciprocate feedback.
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# Collaboration lens{{snd}} This is the ''what'' of CBL. It includes a design of activities that emphasizes looking at local and global needs, building an empathetic desire to help, co-constructing learning goals with teacher and student, and making a plan of action. Students are given the opportunity to create a response to the interaction. They develop the skills needed to address what was found in the interaction.<ref name="Robinson">{{Cite book|title=Connections-based Learning|last=Robinson|first=Sean|publisher=Connections-based Learning|year=2017|isbn=978-1-7751843-1-7|location=Port Coquitlam}}</ref>{{rp|76}} Students critically examine theirs' and others' possible solutions. Innovation is encouraged as students address the need. Those involved honor the connection and document their growth while the process is shared out to elicit feedback. Students use their growing network to further their learning. They respond to and reciprocate feedback.
# Cultivation lens{{snd}} This is the ''why'' of CBL. It includes making a "better you", a "better me", and a "better us".<ref name=":2">{{Cite book|title=Connections-based Learning|last=Robinson|first=Sean|publisher=Connections-based Learning|year=2017|isbn=978-1-7751843-1-7|location=Port Coquitlam|pages=141}}</ref> People connect for a "better you" making positive change in the world, a "better me" developing their citizenship and character, and a "better us" creating a positive relationship that promotes mutual understanding.<ref name=":2" />
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# Cultivation lens{{snd}} This is the ''why'' of CBL. It includes making a "better you", a "better me", and a "better us". People connect for a "better you" making positive change in the world, a "better me" developing their citizenship and character, and a "better us" creating a positive relationship that promotes mutual understanding.<ref name="Robinson" />{{rp|141}}
  
 
== Examples ==
 
== Examples ==
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CBL was detailed on p.&nbsp;31 in the Fall 2015 edition of ''Living Education eMagazine''<ref name=":0">{{Cite web|url=http://issuu.com/livingeducationemagazine/docs/fall_2015_leem_107|title=Living Education eMagazine 2015 Fall Edition (Vol. XIV)|last=|first=|date=October 1, 2015|website=Living Education eMagazine 2015 Fall Edition (Vol. XIV)|publisher=Forest of the Rain|access-date=|accessdate=2015-12-27}}</ref> where it was explained that "Connections-based Learning makes it a priority to leverage interpersonal connection at each step of the learning process. Whether it is the teacher-student connection, the connection with members of the class, school, and community, or the connection with experts in the field of study, thought is given to maximizing these relationships." Positive teacher–student relationships have been noted to transform classes into supportive spaces that lead to more positive outcomes for students, both socially and academically.<ref>{{Cite book|title = Early teacher–child relationships and the trajectory of children's school outcomes through eighth grade|last = Hamre, B. K., & Pianta, R. C.|first =|publisher = Child Development|year = 2001|isbn =|location =|pages = 625–638}}</ref>
 
CBL was detailed on p.&nbsp;31 in the Fall 2015 edition of ''Living Education eMagazine''<ref name=":0">{{Cite web|url=http://issuu.com/livingeducationemagazine/docs/fall_2015_leem_107|title=Living Education eMagazine 2015 Fall Edition (Vol. XIV)|last=|first=|date=October 1, 2015|website=Living Education eMagazine 2015 Fall Edition (Vol. XIV)|publisher=Forest of the Rain|access-date=|accessdate=2015-12-27}}</ref> where it was explained that "Connections-based Learning makes it a priority to leverage interpersonal connection at each step of the learning process. Whether it is the teacher-student connection, the connection with members of the class, school, and community, or the connection with experts in the field of study, thought is given to maximizing these relationships." Positive teacher–student relationships have been noted to transform classes into supportive spaces that lead to more positive outcomes for students, both socially and academically.<ref>{{Cite book|title = Early teacher–child relationships and the trajectory of children's school outcomes through eighth grade|last = Hamre, B. K., & Pianta, R. C.|first =|publisher = Child Development|year = 2001|isbn =|location =|pages = 625–638}}</ref>
  
The approach can be seen in various Canadian school districts such as the Coquitlam School District<ref>{{Cite news|url=http://www.tricitynews.com/community/port-coquitlam-school-connects-for-learning-1.19080323|title=Port Coquitlam school connects for learning|last=Strandberg|first=Diane|date=May 9, 2017|work=The Tri City News|access-date=May 16, 2017}}</ref> Avon Maitland District School Board<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://edublog.amdsb.ca/tlc/2016/08/18/connected-learning-opportunities-for-kids-in-september-2016/|title=AMDSB EdTech Learning Community|last=|first=|date=August 18, 2016|website=AMDSB EdTech Learning Community|publisher=Avon Maitland District School Board|access-date=September 17, 2016}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web|url=http://edublog.amdsb.ca/tlc/2016/08/18/connected-learning-opportunities-for-kids-in-september-2016/|title=Connected Learning Opportunities for Kids in September 2016!|last=|first=|date=August 18, 2016|website=AMDSB EdTech Learning Community|publisher=Avon Maitland District School Board|access-date=September 18, 2016}}</ref> and the digital Human Library.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://digitalhumanlibrary.com/thank-wonderful-year-connections-based-learning/|title=Thank You for a Wonderful Year of Connections-Based Learning!|last=|first=|date=June 27, 2016|website=digital Human Library|publisher=digital Human Library|access-date=September 18, 2016}}</ref> The approach has been talked about by organizations such as the Computer Using Educators of British Columbia<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://cuebc.ca/conference/sessions.php|title=Computer Using Educators of British Columbia|last=|first=|date=September 7, 2016|website=Computer Using Educators Conference|publisher=Computer Using Educators of British Columbia|access-date=October 3, 2016}}</ref> and Calliope Global Education Initiatives where they state that CBL "leads to personal connection among global peers; furthering of such relationships builds teamwork and sense of providence so that students can affect wider audiences as well as change on an international level and in those global communities needing help."<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.calliopeglobal.com/ourblueearth.html|title=Our Blue Earth|last=Siracusa|first=Fran|date=April 10, 2016|website=Calliope Global Education Initiaves|publisher=Calliope|access-date=February 1, 2017}}</ref>
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The approach can be seen in various Canadian school districts such as the Coquitlam School District<ref>{{Cite news|url=http://www.tricitynews.com/community/port-coquitlam-school-connects-for-learning-1.19080323|title=Port Coquitlam school connects for learning|last=Strandberg|first=Diane|date=May 9, 2017|work=The Tri City News|access-date=May 16, 2017}}</ref> Avon Maitland District School Board<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://edublog.amdsb.ca/tlc/2016/08/18/connected-learning-opportunities-for-kids-in-september-2016/|title=AMDSB EdTech Learning Community|last=|first=|date=August 18, 2016|website=AMDSB EdTech Learning Community|publisher=Avon Maitland District School Board|access-date=September 17, 2016}}{{Dead link|date=January 2020 |bot=InternetArchiveBot |fix-attempted=yes }}</ref><ref>{{Cite web|url=http://edublog.amdsb.ca/tlc/2016/08/18/connected-learning-opportunities-for-kids-in-september-2016/|title=Connected Learning Opportunities for Kids in September 2016!|last=|first=|date=August 18, 2016|website=AMDSB EdTech Learning Community|publisher=Avon Maitland District School Board|access-date=September 18, 2016}}{{Dead link|date=January 2020 |bot=InternetArchiveBot |fix-attempted=yes }}</ref> and the digital Human Library.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://digitalhumanlibrary.com/thank-wonderful-year-connections-based-learning/|title=Thank You for a Wonderful Year of Connections-Based Learning!|last=|first=|date=June 27, 2016|website=digital Human Library|publisher=digital Human Library|access-date=September 18, 2016}}</ref> The approach has been talked about by organizations such as the Computer Using Educators of British Columbia<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://cuebc.ca/conference/sessions.php|title=Computer Using Educators of British Columbia|last=|first=|date=September 7, 2016|website=Computer Using Educators Conference|publisher=Computer Using Educators of British Columbia|access-date=October 3, 2016|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20161005093448/http://cuebc.ca/conference/sessions.php|archive-date=October 5, 2016|url-status=dead}}</ref> and Calliope Global Education Initiatives where they state that CBL "leads to personal connection among global peers; furthering of such relationships builds teamwork and sense of providence so that students can affect wider audiences as well as change on an international level and in those global communities needing help."<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://www.calliopeglobal.com/ourblueearth.html|title=Our Blue Earth|last=Siracusa|first=Fran|date=April 10, 2016|website=Calliope Global Education Initiaves|publisher=Calliope|access-date=February 1, 2017|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20160512003219/http://www.calliopeglobal.com/ourblueearth.html|archive-date=May 12, 2016|url-status=dead}}</ref>
  
 
In the ''HundrED'' article "Connections-Based Learning Should Be The Future Of Education", Josephine Lister stated, "Connections-based learning is one of the most useful tools a teacher has at their disposal, but many feel they don't have the time to utilize it—or don't realize that they could!"<ref name=":3">{{Cite web|url=https://hundred.org/en/articles/connections-based-learning-should-be-the-future-of-education|title=Connections-based Learning Should Be The Future of Education|last=Lister|first=Josephine|date=February 14, 2018|website=HundrED|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=|access-date=January 14, 2020}}</ref> The approach is being used in Nigeria through the Schoolinka Linking Classrooms program,<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://schoolinka.ng/programs/lcp/|title=Schoolinka|last=Linking Classrooms Program|first=|date=|website=Schoolinka|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=|access-date=January 14, 2020}}</ref> in Norway at the Nannestad High School,<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://ltsig.iatefl.org/connections-based-learning-the-right-way-to-go/|title=Connections-based Learning: The Right Way To Go|last=Longwell|first=Phil|date=June 29, 2018|website=Learning Technologies Special Interest Group|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=|access-date=January 14, 2020}}</ref> in Israel at Education Cities, in Cambodia at the Liger Leadership Academy, and Shanghai, China at Microcampus.<ref name=":3" /> In the book ''Promoting Global Competencies Through Media Literacy'' by Melda N. Yildez, CBL and its accompanying website is recommended as a global education resource and organization.<ref>{{Cite book|title=Promoting Global Competencies Through Media Literacy|last=Yildiz|first=Melda|publisher=IGI Global|year=2017|isbn=1522530827|location=Hershey|pages=256}}</ref>
 
In the ''HundrED'' article "Connections-Based Learning Should Be The Future Of Education", Josephine Lister stated, "Connections-based learning is one of the most useful tools a teacher has at their disposal, but many feel they don't have the time to utilize it—or don't realize that they could!"<ref name=":3">{{Cite web|url=https://hundred.org/en/articles/connections-based-learning-should-be-the-future-of-education|title=Connections-based Learning Should Be The Future of Education|last=Lister|first=Josephine|date=February 14, 2018|website=HundrED|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=|access-date=January 14, 2020}}</ref> The approach is being used in Nigeria through the Schoolinka Linking Classrooms program,<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://schoolinka.ng/programs/lcp/|title=Schoolinka|last=Linking Classrooms Program|first=|date=|website=Schoolinka|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=|access-date=January 14, 2020}}</ref> in Norway at the Nannestad High School,<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://ltsig.iatefl.org/connections-based-learning-the-right-way-to-go/|title=Connections-based Learning: The Right Way To Go|last=Longwell|first=Phil|date=June 29, 2018|website=Learning Technologies Special Interest Group|url-status=live|archive-url=|archive-date=|access-date=January 14, 2020}}</ref> in Israel at Education Cities, in Cambodia at the Liger Leadership Academy, and Shanghai, China at Microcampus.<ref name=":3" /> In the book ''Promoting Global Competencies Through Media Literacy'' by Melda N. Yildez, CBL and its accompanying website is recommended as a global education resource and organization.<ref>{{Cite book|title=Promoting Global Competencies Through Media Literacy|last=Yildiz|first=Melda|publisher=IGI Global|year=2017|isbn=1522530827|location=Hershey|pages=256}}</ref>
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Saul Mwame, a Tanzanian youth advocate used Connections-Based Learning (CBL) to co-found a club to help visually-impaired students in his community. According to Mwame: “I started CBL … after observing that fellow students with special needs lack cooperation. So, this was the way to sensitize cooperation so that visually-impaired students can have access to academic materials …to help them achieve their goals.” <ref>https://globalvoices.org/2019/10/13/this-tanzanian-youth-advocate-has-a-vision-for-inclusive-education/</ref>
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In "How Do We Solve the Educational Gap Between Rural and Urban Areas? Connectivity," Josephine Lister demonstrates how connectivity helps students "engage and learn from others across the entire world." She states that "connectivity in schools doesn’t have to be a whole school model though, it can be installed into the school day through the simplest of tasks. HundrED Ambassador and [[Global Teacher Prize]] finalist, Barbara Zielonka, uses connections-based-learning to help her students learn about the real world."<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://medium.com/edmodoblog/how-do-we-solve-the-educational-gap-between-rural-and-urban-areas-connectivity-5e22238a3a63|title=How Do We Solve the Educational Gap Between Rural and Urban Areas? Connectivity.|last=Lister|first=Josephine|date=2018-07-11|website=Medium|language=en|access-date=2020-01-15}}</ref> In her 2019 book ''Keys to Educational Success: The Teaching Methods of a Top 10 Finalist of the Global Teacher Prize'', Zielonka claims that with "connections-based learning, students have authentic experiences that cannot be created otherwise."<ref>{{Cite book|title=Keys to Educational Success: The Teaching Methods of a Top 10 Finalist of the Global Teacher Prize|last=Zielonka|first=Barbara|publisher=|year=2019|isbn=|location=Nannestad, Norway|pages=22}}</ref>
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==

Revision as of 07:16, 16 January 2020

This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on January 14 2020. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Connections-based_learning. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Connections-based_learning, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Connections-based_learning. Purge

Connections-based Learning infographic
CBL infographic by Sean Robinson and Leigh Cassell

Connections-based learning (CBL) is a pedagogical approach to education that uses online and offline connections with students, experts, organizations, the community,[1] and classrooms around the globe[2] to teach and to learn. CBL emphasizes contacting and interacting with others inside and outside the class giving students a "real-world" experience. CBL was created by teacher Sean Robinson.[3][4]

Contrast with other approaches

CBL approach differs from project-based learning as student activities do not have to revolve around a project. The student tasks must include some form of interaction or interaction attempt. Instead of asking where the information can be found or how it can be learned, the proponents ask: "Who can we engage as we learn?" The ensuing step is to then attempt to connect with that individual, expert or organization and build with them a connection that moves the students forward in their learning. The use of messaging apps and social media such as Google Hangouts, Skype chats,[5] Twitter, and the use of digital portfolios, aims to open the door for student connection.

CBL differs from connected learning, which is a type of learning based on personal interest. Cultural anthropologist Mizuko Ito and colleagues (2013) stated: "Connected learning is realized when a young person pursues a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults, and is in turn able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career possibilities, or civic engagement."[6]

Elements

Connections-based learning focuses on leveraging the various relationships within the educational structure. CBL purports that the teacher–student relationship is foundational to a student's education.[7] With that in mind CBL includes aspects of social-emotional learning. Focus is put on fostering a positive teacher–student relationship through digital and non-digital dialogue, classroom meetings, and a supportive environment. Building relationships outside the classroom is also vital for implementing CBL. These relationships include: connections with the community around the school and global partners, connections with organizations, and connections with content experts. A relationship that benefits both parties is the goal.

Connections-based learning has three major elements[8] which guide this way of seeing teaching and learning:

  1. Connection lensTemplate:Snd This is the who of CBL. The lens focuses the class on finding a learning partner with whom to work. These partners could include a person or group in the local community, an expert in a certain field, an organization that can be supported, or another classroom, either local or global, with whom to work.
  2. Collaboration lensTemplate:Snd This is the what of CBL. It includes a design of activities that emphasizes looking at local and global needs, building an empathetic desire to help, co-constructing learning goals with teacher and student, and making a plan of action. Students are given the opportunity to create a response to the interaction. They develop the skills needed to address what was found in the interaction.[9]Template:Rp Students critically examine theirs' and others' possible solutions. Innovation is encouraged as students address the need. Those involved honor the connection and document their growth while the process is shared out to elicit feedback. Students use their growing network to further their learning. They respond to and reciprocate feedback.
  3. Cultivation lensTemplate:Snd This is the why of CBL. It includes making a "better you", a "better me", and a "better us". People connect for a "better you" making positive change in the world, a "better me" developing their citizenship and character, and a "better us" creating a positive relationship that promotes mutual understanding.[9]Template:Rp

Examples

  • Raising funds or resources to help organizations
  • Activities that promote social action in the community
  • Students building devices that support social action in response to a connection[10]
  • Students building food hampers for local families in need
  • Using social media to allow students to connect from different cities or countries to learn together and from each other
  • Guided Twitter interaction between students for the purpose of learning about each other's situation, customs or country
  • Using video conferencing apps like Skype to allow students to interact with an expert

Research

In the article "Videoconferencing for Global Citizenship Education: Wise Practices for Social Studies Educators" in the Journal of Social Studies Education Research, Krutka and Carano (2016) examined the scholarly literature on videoconferencing in the classroom. They list organizations that provide opportunities for global classroom connections such as the digital Human Library which has "the aim of creating opportunities for connections-based learning by establishing partnerships with teachers and schools in other countries around the world."[11] The examples they examined "make a strong case for why social studies educators should consider integrating videoconferencing into their classes and teachers and scholars alike should research videoconferencing for GCE [Global Citizenship Education]." [11]

In the book How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience and School (2000), which does not mention CBL, education professor John D. Bransford and colleagues shared five ways technology can be used to make effective learning environments.[12] These include "bringing real-world problems into the classrooms" with "internet connections to concrete data and working scientists", "increasing opportunities for students to receive feedback from software, tutors, teachers, and peers", and "to build local and global communities of teachers, administrators, students, parents, and other interested learners".[12] Environments where connection is maximized allow for students to engage in their own learning and have a voice into others' growth.[12]

Willms, Friesen, and Milton (2009) carried out a study that supports the outcomes of CBL but does not mention CBL.[13] They developed a measure of student engagement and, after gaining data from 93 schools in districts across Canada, recommended that students solve real problems, learn from the community, and connect with experts and expertise.[13]

Reception

Teacher-librarian Jennifer Casa-Todd lauded the CBL approach in her book Social LEADia.[14] Casa-Todd explained how she was drawn to the approach because it complements her core beliefs about the relationship between digital leadership and connecting students to real projects and people.

CBL was detailed on p. 31 in the Fall 2015 edition of Living Education eMagazine[7] where it was explained that "Connections-based Learning makes it a priority to leverage interpersonal connection at each step of the learning process. Whether it is the teacher-student connection, the connection with members of the class, school, and community, or the connection with experts in the field of study, thought is given to maximizing these relationships." Positive teacher–student relationships have been noted to transform classes into supportive spaces that lead to more positive outcomes for students, both socially and academically.[15]

The approach can be seen in various Canadian school districts such as the Coquitlam School District[16] Avon Maitland District School Board[17][18] and the digital Human Library.[19] The approach has been talked about by organizations such as the Computer Using Educators of British Columbia[20] and Calliope Global Education Initiatives where they state that CBL "leads to personal connection among global peers; furthering of such relationships builds teamwork and sense of providence so that students can affect wider audiences as well as change on an international level and in those global communities needing help."[21]

In the HundrED article "Connections-Based Learning Should Be The Future Of Education", Josephine Lister stated, "Connections-based learning is one of the most useful tools a teacher has at their disposal, but many feel they don't have the time to utilize it—or don't realize that they could!"[22] The approach is being used in Nigeria through the Schoolinka Linking Classrooms program,[23] in Norway at the Nannestad High School,[24] in Israel at Education Cities, in Cambodia at the Liger Leadership Academy, and Shanghai, China at Microcampus.[22] In the book Promoting Global Competencies Through Media Literacy by Melda N. Yildez, CBL and its accompanying website is recommended as a global education resource and organization.[25]

Saul Mwame, a Tanzanian youth advocate used Connections-Based Learning (CBL) to co-found a club to help visually-impaired students in his community. According to Mwame: “I started CBL … after observing that fellow students with special needs lack cooperation. So, this was the way to sensitize cooperation so that visually-impaired students can have access to academic materials …to help them achieve their goals.” [26]

In "How Do We Solve the Educational Gap Between Rural and Urban Areas? Connectivity," Josephine Lister demonstrates how connectivity helps students "engage and learn from others across the entire world." She states that "connectivity in schools doesn’t have to be a whole school model though, it can be installed into the school day through the simplest of tasks. HundrED Ambassador and Global Teacher Prize finalist, Barbara Zielonka, uses connections-based-learning to help her students learn about the real world."[27] In her 2019 book Keys to Educational Success: The Teaching Methods of a Top 10 Finalist of the Global Teacher Prize, Zielonka claims that with "connections-based learning, students have authentic experiences that cannot be created otherwise."[28]

References

  1. "Students from Citadel Middle School Bake a Difference". January 17, 2014. https://www.foodbanking.org/students-citadel-middle-school-bake-difference. Template:Dead link
  2. "Connected Learning Partnerships". Sean Robinson. April 1, 2016. http://www.connectionsbasedlearning.com/clp.html. 
  3. Jenkin, Matthew. (Dec. 2013). Project-based learning: the top teachers to follow on Twitter. theguardian.com. Retrieved March 23, 2016.
  4. Robinson, Sean (December 4, 2016). "A Journey into Space". Microsoft. https://educationblog.microsoft.com/en-ca/2017/10/a-journey-into-space/. 
  5. Ferrell, Keith (April 5, 2011). "Rationale for Using Skype in the Classroom". Ed Tech Ideas. https://edtechideas.com/2011/04/05/rationale-for-using-skype-in-the-classroom/. 
  6. Ito, M.; Gutiérrez, K.; Livingstone, S.; Penuel, B.; Rhodes, J.; Salen, K.; Schor, J.; Sefton-Green, J.; Watkins, S.G. (2013). Connected learning: An agenda for research and design Template:Webarchive (PDF). Irvine, CA: Digital Media and Learning Research Hub.
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