Difference between revisions of "Dale Brown Emeagwali"

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== Early life and education ==
 
== Early life and education ==
Emeagwali was born Dale Donita Brown on December 24, 1954 to Doris Brown, a schoolteacher, and Leon Brown, a magazine production department superintendent.<ref name=":2" /> Despite facing [[Racial segregation in the United States|racial segregation]] at school and in the community, she graduated from high school at the top of her class.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://emeagwali.com/dale/|title=Dale Emeagwali honored as 'Scientist of the Year'|website=emeagwali.com|accessdate=2015-11-30}}</ref> She earned her bachelor's degree in biology from [[Coppin State University]] and her doctorate in microbiology from [[Georgetown University School of Medicine]].{{citation needed|date=April 2019}}  
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Emeagwali was born Dale Donita Brown on December 24, 1954 to Doris Brown, a schoolteacher, and Leon Brown, a magazine production department superintendent.<ref name=":2" /> Despite facing [[Racial segregation in the United States|racial segregation]] at school and in the community, she graduated from high school at the top of her class.<ref>{{Cite web|url=http://emeagwali.com/dale/|title=Dale Emeagwali honored as 'Scientist of the Year'|website=emeagwali.com|accessdate=2015-11-30}}</ref> She earned her bachelor's degree in biology from [[Coppin State University]] and her doctorate in microbiology from [[Georgetown University School of Medicine]].{{citation needed|date=April 2019}}<ref name="stlouis">{{cite news |title=Science Stars: African-American microbiologist Dale Emeagwali |url=http://www.stlamerican.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/eedition/3/a1/3a1beb7a-412d-59d0-b037-e162b2be7aad/530edc9586623.pdf.pdf |accessdate=13 July 2019 |work=St Louis American |date=Feb 27, 2014}}</ref>
  
 
On August 15, 1981, she married [[Philip Emeagwali]], with whom she had one son.{{Citation needed|date=April 2019}}
 
On August 15, 1981, she married [[Philip Emeagwali]], with whom she had one son.{{Citation needed|date=April 2019}}
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Emeagwali's early research focused on the bacterial order [[Actinomycetales]], particularly the genus ''[[Streptomyces]]'', from which the [[antibacterial agent]] [[streptomycin]] is derived. Her most important{{according to whom|date=April 2019}} discovery was the existence of [[kynurenine]] [[formamidase]] [[isozyme]]s in ''[[Streptomyces parvulus]]''.<ref name=":1">{{Cite web|title = Biographies of Scientists: Dale Brown Emeagwali - Microbiologist and Community Leader - Blogs - Tips|url = http://tips.fm/entry.php?2549-Biographies-of-Scientists-Dale-Brown-Emeagwali-Microbiologist-and-Community-Leader|website = tips.fm|accessdate = 2015-12-01}}</ref>  
 
Emeagwali's early research focused on the bacterial order [[Actinomycetales]], particularly the genus ''[[Streptomyces]]'', from which the [[antibacterial agent]] [[streptomycin]] is derived. Her most important{{according to whom|date=April 2019}} discovery was the existence of [[kynurenine]] [[formamidase]] [[isozyme]]s in ''[[Streptomyces parvulus]]''.<ref name=":1">{{Cite web|title = Biographies of Scientists: Dale Brown Emeagwali - Microbiologist and Community Leader - Blogs - Tips|url = http://tips.fm/entry.php?2549-Biographies-of-Scientists-Dale-Brown-Emeagwali-Microbiologist-and-Community-Leader|website = tips.fm|accessdate = 2015-12-01}}</ref>  
  
Her later research demonstrated that [[Antisense RNA|antisense]] methodology{{vague|date=April 2019}} can be used to suppress gene expression in cancerous cells.<ref>{{Cite book|title = African Americans in Science: An Encyclopedia of People and Progress|last = Carey|first = Charles W.|publisher = ABC-CLIO|year = 2008|isbn = |location = Santa Barbara, CA|pages = 70–71}}</ref>
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Her later research demonstrated that [[Antisense RNA|antisense]] methodology{{vague|date=April 2019}} can be used to suppress gene expression in cancerous cells.<ref>{{Cite book|title = African Americans in Science: An Encyclopedia of People and Progress|last = Carey|first = Charles W.|publisher = ABC-CLIO|year = 2008|isbn = 9781851099986|location = Santa Barbara, CA|pages = 70–71 | url=https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=W0nw5KTJJygC&lpg=PA70&ots=A2ZxZGkwNt&dq=dale%20brown%20emeagwali&pg=PA70#v=onepage&q=dale%20brown%20emeagwali&f=false}}</ref>
  
 
== Awards and honors ==
 
== Awards and honors ==

Revision as of 06:27, 14 July 2019

This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on July 12 2019. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Dale_Brown_Emeagwali. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Dale_Brown_Emeagwali. Purge
Scientist

Dale Brown Emeagwali (born December 24, 1954) is an American microbiologist and cancer researcher whose accomplishments include the discovery of kynurenine formamidase isozymes in Streptomyces parvulus, proof that cancer gene expression can be inhibited by antisense methodology,Template:Clarify and demonstration of overlapping gene expressionTemplate:Clarify in a DNA virus.Template:Which She received the 1996 Scientist of the Year award from the National Technical Honor Society.

Early life and education

Emeagwali was born Dale Donita Brown on December 24, 1954 to Doris Brown, a schoolteacher, and Leon Brown, a magazine production department superintendent.[1] Despite facing racial segregation at school and in the community, she graduated from high school at the top of her class.[2] She earned her bachelor's degree in biology from Coppin State University and her doctorate in microbiology from Georgetown University School of Medicine.[no citations needed here][3]

On August 15, 1981, she married Philip Emeagwali, with whom she had one son.[no citations needed here]

Career

Fellowships

Template:Unreferenced section Emeagwali completed concurrent postdoctoral fellowships with the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the American Cancer Society, and the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. She subsequently completed a fellowship with the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences.[4]

Research

In 1986, Emeagwali worked as a research associate at the University of Wyoming. From 1987 to 1992 she served as an assistant research scientist at the University of Michigan. She was a research associate at the University of Minnesota from 1992 to 1996. That year, while working at Ball State University,[1] she was named Scientist of the Year by the National Technical Honor Society for her contributions in the fields of microbiology, molecular biology and biochemistry.[4]

Emeagwali's early research focused on the bacterial order Actinomycetales, particularly the genus Streptomyces, from which the antibacterial agent streptomycin is derived. Her most importantTemplate:According to whom discovery was the existence of kynurenine formamidase isozymes in Streptomyces parvulus.[5]

Her later research demonstrated that antisense methodologyTemplate:Vague can be used to suppress gene expression in cancerous cells.[6]

Awards and honors

Publications

  • 1980 “Evidence of a Constitutive and Inducible Form of Kynurenine Formamidase,” Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics[7]
  • 1984 “Sequence Homology Between the Structural Proteins of Kilham Rat Virus,” Journal of Virology[8]
  • 1989 “Modulation of Ras Expression by Antisense Non-ionic Deoxyoligonucleotide Analogues,” Journal of Gene Research[9]
  • 1990 “Amplified Expression of Three Jun Family Members Inhibits Erytholeukemia Differentiation”[10]

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Oakes, Elizabeth H. (2007). "Emeagwali, Dale Brown". Encyclopedia of World Scientists, Revised Edition. New York: Facts on File, Inc.. pp. 210–211. 
  2. "Dale Emeagwali honored as 'Scientist of the Year'". http://emeagwali.com/dale/. Retrieved 2015-11-30. 
  3. "Science Stars: African-American microbiologist Dale Emeagwali". St Louis American. Feb 27, 2014. http://www.stlamerican.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/eedition/3/a1/3a1beb7a-412d-59d0-b037-e162b2be7aad/530edc9586623.pdf.pdf. Retrieved 13 July 2019. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Dale Brown Emeagwali (1954- ) • BlackPast" (in en-US). 2018-12-26. https://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history/dale-brown-emeagwali-1954/. 
  5. "Biographies of Scientists: Dale Brown Emeagwali - Microbiologist and Community Leader - Blogs - Tips". http://tips.fm/entry.php?2549-Biographies-of-Scientists-Dale-Brown-Emeagwali-Microbiologist-and-Community-Leader. Retrieved 2015-12-01. 
  6. Carey, Charles W. (2008). African Americans in Science: An Encyclopedia of People and Progress. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. pp. 70–71. ISBN 9781851099986. https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=W0nw5KTJJygC&lpg=PA70&ots=A2ZxZGkwNt&dq=dale%20brown%20emeagwali&pg=PA70#v=onepage&q=dale%20brown%20emeagwali&f=false. 
  7. Brown, D. D.; Hitchcock, M. J.; Katz, E. (1980-06-01). "Evidence for a constitutive and inducible form of kynurenine formamidase in an actinomycin-producing strain of Streptomyces parvulus". Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics 202 (1): 18–22. Template:Citation error. ISSN 0003-9861. PMID 6156659. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=%25E2%2580%259CEvidence+of+a+Constitutive+and+Inducible+Form+of+Kynurenine+Formamidase%252C%25E2%2580%259D. 
  8. Brown, D. D.; Salzman, L. A. (1984-03-01). "Sequence homology between the structural proteins of Kilham rat virus". Journal of Virology 49 (3): 1018–1020. ISSN 0022-538X. PMC 255569. PMID 6699933. //www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC255569/. 
  9. Brown, D.; Yu, Z. P.; Miller, P.; Blake, K.; Wei, C.; Kung, H. F.; Black, R. J.; Ts'o, P. O. et al. (1989-01-01). "Modulation of ras expression by anti-sense, nonionic deoxyoligonucleotide analogs". Oncogene Research 4 (4): 243–252. ISSN 0890-6467. PMID 2671865. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Modulation+of+Ras+Expression+by+Antisense+Non-ionic+Deoxyoligonucleotide+Analogues. 
  10. Prochownik, E. V.; Smith, M. J.; Snyder, K.; Emeagwali, D. (1990-11-01). "Amplified expression of three jun family members inhibits erythroleukemia differentiation". Blood 76 (9): 1830–1837. ISSN 0006-4971. PMID 2121297. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Amplified+Expression+of+Three+Jun+Family+Members+Inhibits+Erytholeukemia+Differentiation+Blood. 

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