Arnold zu Windisch-Graetz

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Original short description: "Austrian nobleman and Lutheran clergyman"

Template:Infobox royalty

Prince Arnold zu Windisch-Graetz (Arnold Prinz zu Windisch-Graetz in German; 13 January 1929[1] — September 30, 2007[2]) was a Slovenian-born Austrian nobleman, historian, and Lutheran clergyman. He served as the Chaplain of the Priory of St. Norbert and the Assistant Grand Chaplain of the Priory of the United States for the Sovereign Military Order of the Temple of Jerusalem. At the time of his death he was one of the longest-serving clerics in Chicago.

Biography

Prince Arnold zu Windisch-Graetz was born on 13 January 1929 in the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, present-day Slovenia. He was the son of Prince Franz Joseph zu Windisch-Graetz and Princess Mathilde Luise zu Windisch-Graetz, Austro-Slovenian members of the House of Windisch-Graetz.[3] He immigrated to the United States and became an ordained minister in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod. In 1967 he was assigned by the Synod to be the pastor of Concordia Lutheran Church of Chicago, a German-speaking congregation, where he served for forty years.[2][4][5] His church grew to a size of 1,300, and then shrank.[6] He received a master's degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago and also worked as a church and medieval historian.[1] He served as Chaplain for the Priory of St. Norbert and as Assistant Grand Chaplain of the Priory of the United States for the Sovereign Military Order of the Temple of Jerusalem.[7]

Windisch-Graetz married Renate F. Illies, the German consul in Chicago, who became known as Princess Renate zu Windisch-Graetz.[1][2][7][8][9]

He died on 30 September 2007.[1] His funeral was held at Concordia Lutheran Church on 6 October 2007.[1] He was entombed in the mausoleum in Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago.[2] He was one of the longest-serving clerics in Chicago.[2]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 "Death Notice: Prince Arnold zu Windisch-Graetz". https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-2007-10-05-0710041098-story.html. Retrieved 16 January 2019. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Jensen, Trevor. "Rev. Arnold zu Windisch-Graetz: 1929 - 2007". https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-2007-10-05-0710041012-story.html. Retrieved 16 January 2019. 
  3. Kaplan, Jacob; Pogorzelski, Dan; Reid, Rob; Addlesperger, Elisa (21 July 2014). "Avondale and Chicago's Polish Village". Arcadia Publishing. https://books.google.com/books?id=8ygTBAAAQBAJ&pg=PA41&lpg=PA41&dq=Arnold+zu+Windisch-Graetz&source=bl&ots=qOk4tSx0YE&sig=G7nGaJlFaFxWDxd_mQP2wHQXjwY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwioqea45vLfAhVpw4MKHdUCCAsQ6AEwDnoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=Arnold+zu+Windisch-Graetz&f=false. Retrieved 16 January 2019. 
  4. "Concordia Evangelical Church Faces Steep Debt After Steeple Removed". https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20131124/avondale/concordia-evangelical-church-under-steep-debt-after-steeple-removal. Retrieved 16 January 2019. 
  5. LaTrace, A. J. (12 April 2016). "The People's Guide to Avondale, Chicago's Polish Village". https://chicago.curbed.com/2016/4/12/11414228/chicago-avondale-neighborhood-guide-polish-village. Retrieved 16 January 2019. 
  6. Crew begins removing damaged steeple
  7. 7.0 7.1 "A RESOLUTION ADOPTING THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE CHAPLAIN’S MEETING HOSTED AT CANTERBURY COLLEGE ON THE UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR CAMPUS WHICH WILL BE KNOWN AS THE WINDSOR STATEMENT" (PDF). http://osmth-france.e-monsite.com/medias/files/osmth-windsor-statement.pdf. Retrieved 16 January 2019. 
  8. "Knights Templar leader calls misconceptions amusing, embarrassing". 2 January 2010. https://www.deseretnews.com/article/705355494/Knights-Templar-leader-calls-misconceptions-amusing-embarrassing.html. Retrieved 16 January 2019. 
  9. "History". http://stnorbert.smotj.org/index.php/history. Retrieved 16 January 2019.