Bob Keleher

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This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on June 16 2019. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Bob_Keleher. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Bob_Keleher, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Bob_Keleher. Purge

Template:COI Bob Keleher (1945 - 2012), also known as Robert D. Keleher, was a monetary economist who served as Chief Macroeconomist on the Joint Economic Committee, one of four standing joint committees of the U.S. Congress during the tenure of Manuel H. Johnson who was named to that committee by President Ronald Reagan.

Education

He held a B.S. in Economics from the University of Illinois and a M.A. in Economics from Northern Illinois University. His Ph.D. in Economics was from Indiana University.[no citations needed here]

Writing and research

He was expert in the field of monetary policy[1] and was the co-author of The Monetary Approach to the Balance of Payments, Exchange Rates, and World Inflation[2] with Thomas M. Humphrey (1982).[3] When Robert "Bob" Kelleher was chief of staff to Manuel H. Johnson, Keleher and Johnson co-authored Monetary Policy, A Market Price Approach (1996),[4] a book which in 2019 was cited in the Forbes article, "Trump's Stephen Moore Might Bring A New Perspective To Fed" by Steve Hanke.[3] He wrote Transparency and Federal Reserve monetary policy for the Joint Economic Committee.[5]

Biography

Keleher was born and raised in Chicago. He was a bank economist for the bank holding company First Tennessee National Corporation and became a senior financial economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. At the Atlanta Fed he wrote for that regional bank's Quarterly Review and was responsible for its national economic analysis. Circa 1985-1986 he worked as a senior macroeconomist for the President’s Council of Economic Advisers.[6] He later worked for D.C. consulting firm Johnson Smick International as well as the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress, from which he retired in 2009.[7] He was married to Susan Keleher. He died on May of 2012 after suffering from Parkinson's disease at age 67.[8]

References

  1. "Robert Keleher The Market Monetarist" (in en). https://marketmonetarist.com/tag/robert-keleher/. Retrieved 7 June 2019. 
  2. Humphrey, Thomas M.; Keleher, Robert E.. The monetary approach to the balance of payments, exchange rates, and world inflation. Praeger. ISBN 0030559561. "Praeger Studies in International Monetary Economics and Finance, General Editors: J. Richard Zecher and D.Sykes Wilford" 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Hanke, Steve. "Trump's Stephen Moore Might Bring A New Perspective To Fed" (in en). https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevehanke/2019/03/29/trumps-stephen-moore-might-bring-a-new-perspective-to-fed/#6c74dc9912f3. Retrieved 12 June 2019. 
  4. Johnson, Manuel H.; Keleher, Robert F.. Monetary policy, a market price approach. Quorum Books. ISBN 978-1-56720-059-1. 
  5. Keleher, Robert E. (1997) (in English). Transparency and Federal Reserve monetary policy. Joint Economic Committee. https://www.amazon.com/Transparency-Federal-Reserve-monetary-policy/dp/B0006R8WUW. Retrieved 17 June 2019. 
  6. Official Congressional Directory. U.S. Congress. 2007-2008. https://books.google.com/books?id=rBQalt39A6UC. Retrieved 7 June 2019. 
  7. "Bob Keleher's market price approach to monetary policy". 6 June 2012. https://www.alt-m.org/2012/06/05/bob-kelehers-market-price-approach-to-monetary-policy/. Retrieved 6 June 2019. 
  8. "WaPo obit" (in en). https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/2012/07/04/gJQAl6uoNW_story.html?_=ddid-4-1560040260&utm_term=.24c4b56918b8. Retrieved 9 June 2019.