Jeff Coplon

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Jeff Coplon (born 1951, in Schenectady, New York) is an American journalist and author.

Written Work

After eight years as a daily newspaper reporter, culminating in a stint at the Kansas City Times, he went on to co-write (or "ghost") 11 autobiographies. These include works with Cher and Bill Parcells, along with three New York Times best-sellers: Return with Honor (with Captain Scott O'Grady, 1995); My Story (with Sarah, Duchess of York, 1996); and My Father's Daughter (with Tina Sinatra, 2000). He also co-wrote, with Betty Mahmoody, For the Love of a Child (1992), the sequel to Not Without My Daughter.

Coplon's solo work includes a non-fictional treatment of rodeo bull riding (Gold Buckle, HarperCollins West, 1995) and magazine pieces for New York (magazine) (where he is a contributing editor), The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, Men's Journal, and Playboy. While his topics vary broadly, he has written frequently about NBA basketball, and his work has twice been anthologized in The Best American Sports Writing (1991 and 1997). His New York profile of the late Gerald Boyd, the highest-ranking black editor in the history of the New York Times, won a 2008 Mirror Award from the Newhouse School.

He is also known for a controversial[1] 1988 article in The Village Voice dealing with the Ukrainian famine of the 1930s genocide question and its political implications in the United States.[2]

In article "In Search of a Soviet Holocaust"[3] Jeff Coplon tried to associate those who continued to bring the Holodomor to the attention of the public with the Nazis, even by giving quotes from Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf to stress his point. According to Jeff Coplon, "Just as the Nazis used the OUN for their own ends, so has Reagan exploited the famine, from his purple-prosed commemoration of "this callous act""[3] Cathy Young has described Coplon and Arch Getty as modern followers of Walter Duranty and commented that "Coplon sneered at 'the prevailing vogue of anti-Stalinism' and dismissed as absurd the idea that the famine had been created by the Communist regime. Such talk, he asserted, was meant to justify U.S. imperialism and whitewash Ukrainian collaboration with the Nazis".[4] In a letter to the editors, Robert Conquest dismissing the article by Coplon as "error and absurdity".[5]

Bibliography

  • (2002) Only Son. New York: Warner Books. ISBN 0-446-52552-9.
  • (2000) My Father's Daughter. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-684-87076-2.
  • (1998) The First Time. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-684-80900-1.
  • (1997) The Best American Sports Writing. New York: Mariner Books. ISBN 0-395-79762-4.
  • (1996) My Story. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-684-83581-9.
  • (1995) Gold Buckle: The Grand Obsession of Rodeo Bull Riders. New York: HarperCollins. ISBN 0-06-258545-2.
  • (1995) Return with Honor. New York: Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-48330-9.
  • (1995) Finding a Way to Win. New York: Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-48122-5.
  • (1992) For the Love of a Child. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0-312-08194-4.
  • (1991) The Best American Sports Writing. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 0-395-57043-3.

References

  1. See Robert Conquest's reply here: Conquest, Robert (February 2, 1988). "Letters to the editors". Village Voice (New York). http://www.scribd.com/doc/16317836/The-Ukrainian-Weekly-198808.  – Reprinted by the The Ukrainian Weekly, February 21, 1988
  2. Coplon, Jeff (January 12, 1988). "In Search of a Soviet Holocaust". Village Voice (New York). http://chss.montclair.edu/english/furr/vv.html. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Jeff Coplon, "In Search of a Soviet Holocaust", The Village Voice, January 12, 1988.
  4. Cathy Young (8 December 2008). "Remember the Holodomor: The Soviet starvation of Ukraine, 75 years later". The Weekly Standard. http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/015/861rmjep.asp. Retrieved 1 November 2015. 
  5. Conquest, Robert (February 2, 1988). "Letters to the editors". Village Voice (New York). http://www.scribd.com/doc/16317836/The-Ukrainian-Weekly-198808.  – Reprinted by the The Ukrainian Weekly, February 21, 1988

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