PeekYou

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This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on January 2 2014. This is a backup of Wikipedia:PeekYou. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/PeekYou, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/PeekYou. Purge

Advertising? Template:Infobox Dotcom company PeekYou is a people search engine that indexes people and their links on the web. The name "PeekYou" is explained as a contraction of People and Seek.[1] Founded in April 2006 by Michael Hussey (the founder of RateMyTeachers and RateMyProfessors.com), PeekYou claims to have indexed over 250 million people,[2] mostly in the US and Canada. The search results are built from publicly available URLs, including MySpace profiles, Facebook, LinkedIn, Wikipedia, Google+, blogs, homepages, business pages and news sources.

PeekYou opened its search engine in stealth mode in July 2006.[3] The website is one of the Top 250 US websites, according to Quantcast.[4]

PeekScore

In June 2010, PeekYou launched what it described as the "first digital footprint ranking system for individuals."[5] Called PeekScore, the ranking system rates each of the individuals in the PeekYou index on a scale from one to ten, for the purposes of quantifying the scope of his or her online impact. The algorithm used to calculate the score takes into account the various active aspects of an individual's online life, particularly in the areas of blogging, social networking, and personal websites.[6] The score also factors in all passive facets of an individual's online presence as well, including general mentions of the individual in online news sources, and throughout the internet.[7]

An entertainment blog featuring lists of individuals grouped together based on assorted common traits (shared professions, etc.), and ranked from highest PeekScore to lowest also exists to promote the PeekScore product.[8]

External links

References