Filipino portrayals in American media

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This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on June 17 2015. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Filipino_portrayals_in_American_media. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Filipino_portrayals_in_American_media, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Filipino_portrayals_in_American_media. Purge

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Filipino and Filipina role portrayal in TV/movie/film/media in the U.S.

With the recent plethora of attention on Manny Pacquiao, in the boxing field, there has been an added on underlying ethnic issue. This may have roots in normal competition between boxers and there have always been ethnic tones in boxing matches,[1] but attacks on Manny Pacquiao have focused on his 'Filipino-ness,' being from the Philippines.[2] Unlike other athletes who have had past documented problems with using performance enhancing drugs, Manny Pacquiao has not, yet is being singled out in needing to prove he is clean.[1] This type of scrutiny is focused on the first Filipino athlete to ever be included in Time Magazine's list of the 100 most influential people in the world.[3]

Demeaning portrayal of Filipinos and Filipinos is not limited to boxing. Desperate Housewives debased medical schools of the Philippines.[4] Filipino-American movies such as "The Debut," "American Adobo," and "The Flip Side" in earlier years have not garnered the mainstream audience, and are not household names to the moviegoer in America.[5] This leaves references towards Filipinos such as those made towards Manny Pacquaio on unsubstantiated drug charges, and Filipino and Filipina medical personal on Desperate Housewives, to have clout. Comedian Adam Carolla weighed in on his own attack of Manny Pacquiao and the whole Philippine nation, as well as all Filipinos and Filipinas worldwide for having such ardent support.[6] This attack on an entire nation of people underlies debasing of the 'Filipino-ness' of Manny Pacquiao, an achiever, and lack of positive portrayals of Filipinos and Filipinas in the media.

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