Difference between revisions of "Solomon Radasky"

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== Post-war and later life ==
 
== Post-war and later life ==
Once rejuvenated back to good health, Radasky headed to a town in Germany named Feldafing which was a known place to look for missing persons. Many liberated people went there after the war in hopes of finding friends and family. He found an old friend whose girlfriend’s family were former patrons of his shop. He was then introduced to her friend, Frieda, who became his wife in November of 1946. They had a son born May 13th, 1948, the day before the state of Israel was created. They were able to move to the United States in 1949 and settled in New Orleans, Louisiana. He could not speak any [[English language|English]], but was able to demonstrate his knowledge and skill at a local fur shop working for fifty cents an hour. Out of the 78 people in his extended family, Solomon was the only survivor of the Holocaust. In 1961, Radasky was one of the organizers of a counter-protest of New Orleans survivors in a [[New Americans Club]] against Neo-Nazis led by [[George Lincoln Rockwell]] at the [[Civic Theatre (New Orleans)|Civic Theatre]] for the local premiere of [[Exodus (1960 film)|''Exodus'']], vociferously debating the local [[Anti-Defamation League]] chapter which wished to maintain a low profile during the event.<ref>{{Cite book|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=cxDbrgTjrQMC&pg=PA415|title=Troubled Memory: Anne Levy, the Holocaust, and David Duke's Louisiana|last=Powell|first=Lawrence N.|date=2000|publisher=Univ of North Carolina Press|isbn=9780807825044|language=en}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web|url=https://small-resistance.tulane.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/327/2018/11/WallPanels_ToPrint_noprintersmarks_optimized_Part5.pdf|website=small-resistance.tulane.edu|access-date=2018-12-06}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/23885627|title=When Hate Came to Town: New Orleans' Jews and George Lincoln Rockwell on JSTOR|website=www.jstor.org|language=en|access-date=2018-12-06}}</ref><ref>{{Cite book|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=mjfqCQAAQBAJ&pg=PA425|title=Troubled Memory: Anne Levy, the Holocaust, and David Duke's Louisiana|last=Powell|first=Lawrence N.|date=2003-04-03|publisher=Univ of North Carolina Press|isbn=9780807860489|language=en}}</ref><ref>{{Cite book|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=2Fh_CQAAQBAJ&pg=PT81|title=The Jews of New Orleans and the Mississippi Delta: A History of Life and Community Along the Bayou|last=Ford|first=Emily|last2=Stiefel|first2=Barry|date=2012-10-16|publisher=Arcadia Publishing|isbn=9781614237341|language=en}}</ref> He lived in [[New Orleans]] with his two children and his wife until August 4, 2002, when he passed away at the age of 92. <ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.sutori.com/story/solomon-radasky--58oL93gYyH3xqog9rdSFCmim|title=Solomon Radasky|last1=Loh|first1=Rachel|website=Sutori}}</ref>
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Once rejuvenated back to good health, Radasky headed to a town in Germany named Feldafing which was a known place to look for missing persons. Many liberated people went there after the war in hopes of finding friends and family. He found an old friend whose girlfriend’s family were former patrons of his shop. He was then introduced to her friend, Frieda, who became his wife in November of 1946. They had a son born May 13th, 1948, the day before the state of Israel was created. They were able to move to the United States in 1949 and settled in New Orleans, Louisiana. He could not speak any [[English language|English]], but was able to demonstrate his knowledge and skill at a local fur shop working for fifty cents an hour. Out of the 78 people in his extended family, Solomon was the only survivor of the Holocaust. In 1961, Radasky was one of the organizers of a counter-protest of New Orleans survivors in a [[New Americans Club]] against Neo-Nazis led by [[George Lincoln Rockwell]] at the [[Civic Theatre (New Orleans)|Civic Theatre]] for the local premiere of [[Exodus (1960 film)|''Exodus'']], vociferously debating the local [[Anti-Defamation League]] chapter which wished to maintain a low profile during the event.<ref>{{Cite book|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=cxDbrgTjrQMC&pg=PA415|title=Troubled Memory: Anne Levy, the Holocaust, and David Duke's Louisiana|last=Powell|first=Lawrence N.|date=2000|publisher=Univ of North Carolina Press|isbn=9780807825044|language=en}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web|title= Nazi Hate Ride | url=https://small-resistance.tulane.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/327/2018/11/WallPanels_ToPrint_noprintersmarks_optimized_Part5.pdf|website=small-resistance.tulane.edu|access-date=2018-12-06}}</ref><ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/23885627|title=When Hate Came to Town: New Orleans' Jews and George Lincoln Rockwell on JSTOR|website=www.jstor.org|language=en|access-date=2018-12-06}}</ref><ref>{{Cite book|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=mjfqCQAAQBAJ&pg=PA425|title=Troubled Memory: Anne Levy, the Holocaust, and David Duke's Louisiana|last=Powell|first=Lawrence N.|date=2003-04-03|publisher=Univ of North Carolina Press|isbn=9780807860489|language=en}}</ref><ref>{{Cite book|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=2Fh_CQAAQBAJ&pg=PT81|title=The Jews of New Orleans and the Mississippi Delta: A History of Life and Community Along the Bayou|last=Ford|first=Emily|last2=Stiefel|first2=Barry|date=2012-10-16|publisher=Arcadia Publishing|isbn=9781614237341|language=en}}</ref> He lived in [[New Orleans]] with his two children and his wife until August 4, 2002, when he passed away at the age of 92. <ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.sutori.com/story/solomon-radasky--58oL93gYyH3xqog9rdSFCmim|title=Solomon Radasky|last1=Loh|first1=Rachel|website=Sutori}}</ref>
  
 
== Interview with Radasky ==
 
== Interview with Radasky ==

Revision as of 07:13, 8 December 2018

This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on December 2 2018. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Solomon_Radasky. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Solomon_Radasky, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Solomon_Radasky. Purge

Solomon Radasky was a Holocaust Survivor born in Warsaw, Poland on May 17, 1910 but grew up in in the city smaller city of Praga, near the Vistula river. As the lone survivor of his family of 78 people, he later in life shared his story with historians of how he was able to survive many multiple camps of the worst Concentration camps including Auschwitz, Dachau Concentration Camp, Gross-Rosen, and the Warsaw Ghetto.[1] He and his direct family, like many members of the Holocaust were of Jewish heritage which consisted of his mother, father, two brothers, Moishe and Baruch, and three sisters: Sarah, Rivka and Leah. While in Polan before World War II, Solomon came to own a small tailor shop where he made fur coats as a living. Their life was much like many Polish citizens until the Holocaust in 1941.[2]

World War II, the Warsaw Ghetto and the Nazi Camps

The Holocaust for Radasky began one morning on his way to work at his coat shop. Along the way, he was stopped by German police who arrested him on the spot in the street for being Jewish. Radasky was a successful 31 years old, law-abiding, Jewish, citizen and businessman and had never broken the law. Soon after being arrested, his family was also taken, and together they found themselves forced into the Warsaw Ghetto by the Germans. Radasky and his family were among the roundup of all Jewish people among other “undesirables” targeted by the Nazi government which include, but are not limited to, Soviet citizens and Prisoner of war, disabled individuals, Homosexual individuals and Jehovah’s Witnesses.[2]

At first, Radasky was forced by the Nazi's to clear snow from the railroad tracks in order to keep the trains running, but he was an efficient worker and built up a good reputation among the German soldiers. Eventually, he disclosed his prior career as a tailor to his captors, and they moved him to a shop where he made jackets for the German Officers. His father, mother and elder sister were all killed in the ghetto while he was sent away. His mother and sister were shot on the spot when some Germans asked her if she had any jewelry and she said no. His father was caught smuggling food at the gates and shot in consequence. On April 19th, 1943, the Warsaw Uprising began and was fought for 63 days which was the longest operation conducted by any European resistance group during World War II. One speculation of why it did not succeed is that the Red Army temporarily halted combat operations which allowed the Germans to re-organize and retaliate against the Poles. Many people were killed and Radasky himself was shot in the ankle. Following the uprising, the Germans started moving the Jews and others to work and death camps. Solomon’s remaining two sisters and brothers were put on a train to Treblinka, and he was put on a train to Majdanek. They were separated because Treblinka could only receive 10,000 prisoners in one trip, and there was around 20,000 total. He never saw them again.[3][1]

At Majdanek, Radasky was forced to walk barefoot three kilometers to and from work every day. His ankle was still healing from his gunshot wound, which a former doctor in the camp was able to operate on with only a pocket knife. He could not limp at all, however, for fear of being removed from his job and killed with the others who could not work (women, children, elderly, sick etc). Once another worker smoked a cigarette and a German officer saw the smoke. He came riding around on his horse and demanded to know who did it; nobody answered. He then selected 10 “dogs” as they called them, because they wore tags with numbers, to be hanged, including Radasky. They were in the gallows with the noose fastened around their necks, seconds away from being executed, when another German soldier screamed: “Halt!” He possessed documents containing orders for three groups of 750,000 workers to be transferred to other camps; Radasky was part of that second group. He was subsequently transferred to Auschwitz. Upon arriving at Auschwitz, there was a selection process in which many people were selected to be machine-gunned in a field. Radasky was selected to be a worker and was taken to get a number tattooed on his arm (128232). After the process, he was sent to work at numerous camps including Buna, Gross-Rosen, and Dachau. The Americans kept getting closer and closer to the camps so the Germans put everyone on trains into the mountains. Finally, on May 1st, 1945, The Americans caught up to the train outside a small town named Tutzing and liberated the prisoners.[3] [1]

Post-war and later life

Once rejuvenated back to good health, Radasky headed to a town in Germany named Feldafing which was a known place to look for missing persons. Many liberated people went there after the war in hopes of finding friends and family. He found an old friend whose girlfriend’s family were former patrons of his shop. He was then introduced to her friend, Frieda, who became his wife in November of 1946. They had a son born May 13th, 1948, the day before the state of Israel was created. They were able to move to the United States in 1949 and settled in New Orleans, Louisiana. He could not speak any English, but was able to demonstrate his knowledge and skill at a local fur shop working for fifty cents an hour. Out of the 78 people in his extended family, Solomon was the only survivor of the Holocaust. In 1961, Radasky was one of the organizers of a counter-protest of New Orleans survivors in a New Americans Club against Neo-Nazis led by George Lincoln Rockwell at the Civic Theatre for the local premiere of Exodus, vociferously debating the local Anti-Defamation League chapter which wished to maintain a low profile during the event.[4][5][6][7][8] He lived in New Orleans with his two children and his wife until August 4, 2002, when he passed away at the age of 92. [9]

Interview with Radasky

Radasky's experiences have been shared at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum as well as has been covered by historians, most notably with his experiences in Auschwitz.[10][11][12][13]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Yanarocak, Sara. "He had lost all his family, but he had to survive". Salom Newspaper. http://www.salom.com.tr/haber-108522-ailesinin_tumunu_kaybetmisti_ama_onun_hayatta_kalmasi_gerekiyordu2.html. Retrieved October 31, 2018. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Survivor Stories". http://www.holocaustsurvivors.org/data.show.php?di=record&da=survivors&ke=7. Retrieved 2 December 2018. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 "SOLOMON RADASKY". http://lifeintheshadows.wtonline.org/-solomon-radasky.html. Retrieved 2 December 2018. 
  4. Powell, Lawrence N. (2000) (in en). Troubled Memory: Anne Levy, the Holocaust, and David Duke's Louisiana. Univ of North Carolina Press. ISBN 9780807825044. https://books.google.com/books?id=cxDbrgTjrQMC&pg=PA415. 
  5. "Nazi Hate Ride". https://small-resistance.tulane.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/327/2018/11/WallPanels_ToPrint_noprintersmarks_optimized_Part5.pdf. 
  6. "When Hate Came to Town: New Orleans' Jews and George Lincoln Rockwell on JSTOR" (in en). https://www.jstor.org/stable/23885627. 
  7. Powell, Lawrence N. (2003-04-03) (in en). Troubled Memory: Anne Levy, the Holocaust, and David Duke's Louisiana. Univ of North Carolina Press. ISBN 9780807860489. https://books.google.com/books?id=mjfqCQAAQBAJ&pg=PA425. 
  8. Ford, Emily; Stiefel, Barry (2012-10-16) (in en). The Jews of New Orleans and the Mississippi Delta: A History of Life and Community Along the Bayou. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 9781614237341. https://books.google.com/books?id=2Fh_CQAAQBAJ&pg=PT81. 
  9. Loh, Rachel. "Solomon Radasky". https://www.sutori.com/story/solomon-radasky--58oL93gYyH3xqog9rdSFCmim. 
  10. Hay, Jeff (2014-06-06) (in en). The Holocaust. Greenhaven Publishing LLC. ISBN 9780737768978. https://books.google.co.il/books?id=5oVmDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA145&dq=%2522Solomon+Radasky%2522&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjA2oXe1YDfAhUJqaQKHYAlC2sQ6AEILzAB#v=onepage&q=%2522Solomon%2520Radasky%2522&f=false. 
  11. Faal, Sorcha; Booth, David (2005) (in en). Picking Up the Pieces: Practical Guide for Surviving Economic Crashes, Internal Unrest and Military Supression. Long Trail Acres Publishing. ISBN 9780975322833. https://books.google.co.il/books?id=8c71iqY6WQcC&pg=PA134&dq=%2522Solomon+Radasky%2522&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjA2oXe1YDfAhUJqaQKHYAlC2sQ6AEIKTAA#v=onepage&q=%2522Solomon%2520Radasky%2522&f=false. 
  12. Oakes, Elizabeth H.; Kia, Mehrdad (2004) (in en). Social Science Resources in the Electronic Age: World history. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 9781573564748. https://books.google.co.il/books?id=yF8kiCtBeLoC&pg=PA118&dq=%2522Solomon+Radasky%2522&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjA2oXe1YDfAhUJqaQKHYAlC2sQ6AEINDAC#v=onepage&q=Radasky&f=false%5D%20%5B. 
  13. Carinci, John Paul (2014-08-05) (in en). Awesome Success Principles and Quotations. AuthorHouse. ISBN 9781496928818. https://books.google.co.il/books?id=b8BIBAAAQBAJ&pg=PT55&dq=%2522Solomon+Radasky%2522&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjA2oXe1YDfAhUJqaQKHYAlC2sQ6AEIOzAD#v=onepage&q=%2522Solomon%2520Radasky%2522&f=false.