Difference between revisions of "Tabiti"

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'''Tabiti''' is the queen of the gods in [[Scythian religion]]. Equated by [[Herodotus]] with [[Hestia]]<ref name="auto">{{cite journal|url=https://www.academia.edu/34823985/Argimpasa_Scythian_goddess_patroness_of_shamans_a_comparison_of_historical_archaeological_linguistic_and_ethnographic_data|title=Argimpasa – Scythian goddess, patroness of shamans: a comparison of historical, archaeological, linguistic and ethnographic data|first=Zaur|last=Hasanov|publisher=|journal=BIBLIOTHECA SHAMANISTICA}}</ref><ref name="auto1">Takho-Godi, A. A. 1980. Gestiia. In S. A. Tokarev Mif ы narodov mira: Ėntsiklopediia, t 1 . Moskva: Sov. Ėntsiklopediia.</ref> , she is assumed{{By whom|date=November 2018}} to be a fire and [[solar goddess]]; figurines depicting women sitting in thrones before flames or wielding solar discs seem to be depictions of her.{{Citation Needed|date=November 2018}}
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'''Tabiti''' is the queen of the gods in [[Scythian religion]]. Equated by [[Herodotus]] with [[Hestia]].<ref name="auto">{{cite journal|url=https://www.academia.edu/34823985/Argimpasa_Scythian_goddess_patroness_of_shamans_a_comparison_of_historical_archaeological_linguistic_and_ethnographic_data|title=Argimpasa – Scythian goddess, patroness of shamans: a comparison of historical, archaeological, linguistic and ethnographic data|first=Zaur|last=Hasanov|publisher=|journal=BIBLIOTHECA SHAMANISTICA}}</ref><ref name="auto1">Takho-Godi, A. A. 1980. Gestiia. In S. A. Tokarev Mif ы narodov mira: Ėntsiklopediia, t 1 . Moskva: Sov. Ėntsiklopediia.</ref>
  
 
==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
 
Tabiti is thought to be a hellenized version of a name similar to [[Hindu]] [[Tapati]] and related verb ''tapayati'' ("burns"/"is hot"), as well as [[Avestan]] ''tapaiti'', [[Latin]] ''tepeo'' and several other Indo-European terms for heat.<ref name="auto3">West, M. L. Indo-European Poetry and Myth. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.</ref><ref name="auto4">Cheung, Johnny (2007) Etymological Dictionary of the Iranian Verb (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 2), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 378–379</ref>
 
Tabiti is thought to be a hellenized version of a name similar to [[Hindu]] [[Tapati]] and related verb ''tapayati'' ("burns"/"is hot"), as well as [[Avestan]] ''tapaiti'', [[Latin]] ''tepeo'' and several other Indo-European terms for heat.<ref name="auto3">West, M. L. Indo-European Poetry and Myth. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.</ref><ref name="auto4">Cheung, Johnny (2007) Etymological Dictionary of the Iranian Verb (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 2), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 378–379</ref>
 
==Herodotos' ''Histories''==
 
Tabiti is equated by Herodotus with the a goddess more familiar to his Greek audience, [[Hestia]]; other than a brief clarification to state this deity's native Scythian name, Herodotus mostly refers to Tabiti as "Hestia". According to him, she is the queen of the gods, above all other gods, which form two categories beneath her: one composed of Papaios (equated with [[Zeus]]) and [[Api]] (equated with [[Gaia]]), and another category beneath that one where all other deities fit. Its unclear if Herodotus is ranking these deities in terms of popularity or cosmic/social role, though him referring to "Hestia" as queen of the gods suggests the later.{{Citation Needed|reason=This entire section needs some referencing or removal|date=November 2018}}
 
 
In [[Idanthyrsus]]' speech, he acknowledges only Tabiti and Papaios, the former being the "Scythian queen".{{Citation Needed|reason=Is this in Herodotus or something else?|date=November 2018}}
 
 
==Kurgan figures==
 
Several deity figures made of gold have been found on [[kurgans]]. Some are attributed to Tabiti, depicting women sitting on thrones surrounded by fire or wielding the sun in their hands, sometimes as a mirror{{Citation needed|reason=The details in this sentence and sentence 1 are not present in the references following the next sentence, unclear where this information comes from.|date=November 2018}}. They are rather distinct compared to putative illustrations of [[Argimpasa]] and [[Api]], which have bestial characteristics.<ref name="auto"/><ref name="auto1"/>
 
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Revision as of 07:10, 8 December 2018

This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on November 26 2018. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Tabiti. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Tabiti, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Tabiti. Purge

Tabiti is the queen of the gods in Scythian religion. Equated by Herodotus with Hestia.[1][2]

Etymology

Tabiti is thought to be a hellenized version of a name similar to Hindu Tapati and related verb tapayati ("burns"/"is hot"), as well as Avestan tapaiti, Latin tepeo and several other Indo-European terms for heat.[3][4]

References

  1. Hasanov, Zaur. "Argimpasa – Scythian goddess, patroness of shamans: a comparison of historical, archaeological, linguistic and ethnographic data". BIBLIOTHECA SHAMANISTICA. https://www.academia.edu/34823985/Argimpasa_Scythian_goddess_patroness_of_shamans_a_comparison_of_historical_archaeological_linguistic_and_ethnographic_data. 
  2. Takho-Godi, A. A. 1980. Gestiia. In S. A. Tokarev Mif ы narodov mira: Ėntsiklopediia, t 1 . Moskva: Sov. Ėntsiklopediia.
  3. West, M. L. Indo-European Poetry and Myth. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
  4. Cheung, Johnny (2007) Etymological Dictionary of the Iranian Verb (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 2), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 378–379