Harvest Power

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oooh, orphan Harvest Power, Inc. (Harvest) is an organics management company in North America. The mission of the company is to create a more sustainable future by re-using organic waste. The company uses a variety of technologies including anaerobic digestion, composting, and wood processing to convert organic materials into biogas, compost, soils, mulches and natural fertilizers.[1]

Harvest Power
Website
www.harvestpower.com

History

Harvest Power was founded in 2008 by Paul Sellew.[2] In 2013, Paul Sellew presented at TEDxBoston on the vision for repurposing source separated organic waste.[3]

Challenges

Though Harvest technology is designed to mitigate the odor from the facilities, in 2012 residents of Richmond, BC began to complain about the smell from the nearby Harvest composting facility.[4] The implementation of an anaerobic digestion system rectified the problem. The anaerobic digester was scheduled to come online earlier in the year, and the delay caused an overburdening of the compost facility and the associated odors.[5]

Technology

Composting

Composting is the natural decomposition of organic materials into a nutrient-rich soil amendment that improves the physical, biological and chemical properties of the soil. Harvest operates some of the largest composting facilities in Canada and America. The compost generated at these cites is packaged and sold as GardenPro composts, mulches, and fertilizers.

Anaerobic Digestion

Anaerobic digestion occurs when naturally occurring microorganisms break down biodegradable material in the absence of oxygen. At its anaerobic digesters, Harvest uses the bacteria to break down feedstock and produce biogas, a renewable natural gas.[6] Harvest has anaerobic digesters in Richmond BC, London ON, and Central Florida.[7]

References

  1. Chernova, Yuliya. "Start-Up Turns Waste Into Energy."Template:Subscription Wall Street Journal, 11 April 2012. Web. 25 July 2013
  2. Farrell, Maureen. "Meet The Renewable Entrepreneur." Forbes Magazine, 08 Mar. 2010. Web. 03 July 2013
  3. "Speakers » Paul Sellew." [1] TEDxBoston RSS. TEDxBoston, 25 June 2013. Web. 29 July 2013
  4. Webb, Kate. "Compost Facility in Richmond Creates Stinky Situation." Metro News Vancouver, 22 November 2012. Retrieved 30 August 2013.
  5. Campbell, Alan. "Foul Stenches Eaten up by Digestion System." Richmond News, 21 June 2013. Retrieved 30 August 2013.
  6. Kirsner, Scott. "Making Fuel from Food Waste." Boston Globe, 21 February 2010.Template:Subscription
  7. Sawyer, Haley. "Anaerobic Digestion: Unaddressed Opportunity." Renewable Energy World. Renewable Energy World, 28 Apr. 2011. Web. 25 July 2013
  • Gunders, Dana. [2] "Wasted: How America Is Losing Up to 40 Percent of Its Food from Farm to Fork to Landfill." NRDC (2012): n. pag. Web. 29 July 2013
  • Farrell, Maureen. "Meet The Renewable Entrepreneur." Forbes Magazine, 08 Mar. 2010. Web. 3 July 2013
  • Michael, Whitney.[3] "Cleantech Insights | 2012 Global Cleantech 100 List Announced!" Cleantech Insights RSS. Cleantech Group, 1 Oct. 2012. Web. 29 July 2013
  • "Speakers » Paul Sellew." [4] TEDxBoston RSS. TEDxBoston, 25 June 2013. Web. 29 July 2013
  • Sawyer, Haley. "Anaerobic Digestion: Unaddressed Opportunity." Renewable Energy World. Renewable Energy World, 28 Apr. 2011. Web. 25 July 2013
  • "New Energy Pioneers." Bnef.com. Bloomberg New Energy Finance, n.d. Web. 29 July 2013.