William Bill Wilson, Jr.

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William Bill Wilson, Jr. dedicated his life to juveniles and youths in need shelter, education, counseling, and advocacy. William Bill Wilson, Jr. was born to parents William and Ursula Wilson in 1935. Both of his parents served the community. Bill Wilson Sr. was a member of the elementary and high school board of education in Santa Clara, California for more than 30 years. Ursula Wilson served as a member of the Red Cross for 30 years.[1]

After years of Bill Wilson’s parents demonstrating the importance of serving the community, it came natural for him to follow in their footsteps. Bill Wilson, Jr owned the family business Wilson's Jewel Bakery while spending one year as the mayor in 1965, a total of eight years on the city council from 1963 to 1967, and a member of the Triton Museum of Art Board of Directors. Wilson decided to focus on the welfare of youth by enlisting the services of professors from Santa Clara University, counselors, and political and business leaders to propose a community-based service. With their help the Webster Center opened to the public in 1973 where Bill Wilson served as a member on the board of directors. The Webster center provided individual counseling and a family therapy program, along with housing for the youth.

William Bill Wilson, Jr. earned a master's degree in counseling psychology and dedicated his time as a counselor at the center as a volunteer. After suffering form an unspecified illness William Bill Wilson, Jr died in 1977 at the age of 42.[2] In William Bill Wilson, Jr’s honor the employees and the board of directors renamed the center from the Webster Center to the Bill Wilson center. William Bill Wilson, Jr’s legacy of service lives on as the forefather of the Bill Wilson Center.

References

  1. Lichtenstein, B. (2005). Cemeteries of Santa Clara (pp. 20-21). Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing.
  2. Schuk C. (2013, May 1). Bill Wilson Center Annual “Building Dreams” Fundraiser Celebrates 40 Years Serving the Community. The Santa Clara Weekly. pp. http://www.santaclaraweekly.com/2013/Issue-18/bill_wilson_center_annual_building_dreams_fundraiser_celebrates_40_years_serving_the_community.html.

Bill Wilson Center. (2015). Retrieved from http://www.billwilsoncenter.org/about/

Lichtenstein, B. (2005). Cemeteries of Santa Clara (pp. 20–21). Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing.

Schuk C. (2013, May 1). Bill Wilson Center Annual “Building Dreams” Fundraiser Celebrates 40 Years Serving the Community. The Santa Clara Weekly. pp. http://www.santaclaraweekly.com/2013/Issue-18/bill_wilson_center_annual_building_dreams_fundraiser_celebrates_40_years_serving_the_community.html.