Celtic swimming system

From Deletionpedia.org: a home for articles deleted from Wikipedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article was considered for deletion at Wikipedia on November 6 2017. This is a backup of Wikipedia:Celtic_swimming_system. All of its AfDs can be found at Wikipedia:Special:PrefixIndex/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Celtic_swimming_system, the first at Wikipedia:Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Celtic_swimming_system. Purge

Wikipedia editors had multiple issues with this page:

Template:No footnotes

DPv2 loves original research.

Template:COI

Celtic swim system

The frequency of this convenient swimTemplate:What was habitual almost in 18th century, from the very pioneers of this style, that one should think of similarities in swimming tradition and practice. This tradition correlate with areal of Celtic countries, France, Germany and UK. Technique was convenient, having implied easy swim drills relaying on float and glide phase that was custom and is repeatedly proved in literature of old as well as new age.[1] [2] The sort of technique was applicable in calm waters, as entertainment or just effortless tread that is used in rivers and open waters. Easy swim of effortless sides or long gliding phase float. Convenient similarities are found in seaman, long side technique, long backcrawl, and side Trudgen. Authors that are writing on that convenient matter: Mang and Boon, on English backstroke, Villepion, regarding side backstroke, side backcrawl, Dalton, improving long crawl.[3][4]

From Dalton to English backstroke

Those English, French or German writers of Celtic areal are of somewhat same procédé. In backstroke technique differences are fewer and more refined. Starting from historical and traditional, elementary backstroke Muts, Long thrust Clias, to traditional English backstoke and Long backcrawl of Dalton. Back float is relaying on float glide propulsion, with no disturbances, or in the case of double over arm soft and propulsion. In the system of this swimming strokes writers find leisure class: Dalton, English backstroke, Long Backstroke, Long Side Crawl. Simple backstroke, Elementary backstroke, Dalton, and Inverted bat: all of them are performed easily and use floating in an initial posture.[5][6]

To a frog kick or a float kick, paddle or glide arm move, over water or through water, semi-deep or full pull through. Float kick keep legs straight all the time, without bending so common in a frog kick. Combination of float stroke include: float flutter, float frog, float scissor, floating flutter/scissor, as in composite side to back: over arm 1 arm lead flutter, over arm 1 arm lead frog, over arm 1 arm lead dolphin to float stroke.

System of traditional easy-swim styles

Celtic swimming system


Elementary backstroke
Inverted breaststroke
Long backstoke
English backstroke
Dalton
Water stride
Tortoise
Float stroke
Sepia bone
Mantle stroke
Inverted bat
Bat stroke


Elementary backstroke

Simple backstroke where the arms are simultaneous pulled through under water and make a half pull through.


Inverted breaststroke

This swimming-stroke looks like the simple backstroke where the arms are simultaneous pulled through under water until they are stretched above the head. The leg stroke is a frog-kick. This swimming-stroke is good to swim and is a good exercise for example the English backstroke.

Back trudgeon

This swimming-stroke looks like the Backcrawl where the starting position is on the back and the body rolls when the leg stroke begins. The arms are pulled over one at a time, just like with the backcrawl. The leg stroke is a scissor-kick and starts when one of both arms is pulled over.

Long backstoke

This swimming-stroke looks like the simple backstroke where the arm stroke is a so-called double overarm-stroke. The arms are simultaneous pulled through (a full pull through) followed by a reasonably long gliding-phase (2-3 seconds).


English backstroke

The English backstroke is the modern version of the Long backstroke. This swimming-stroke looks like the Long backstroke and exist out of two long gliding-phases. That means that a gliding-phase follows when the arms are stretched next to the body and when the arms are in front of the body.


Dalton

The body position is on the back and the arms are kept under water while they are simultaneous pulled through horizontally in opposite direction compared with the Long backstroke.

The special leg stroke looks very similar to treading water. Because this swimming stroke is swum backward to the direction of the feet, it is the intention to move your feet on a certain way so you will move backwards. The legs usually alternate continuously while others add a short gliding phase when the arms are moved above the head.


Back trudgeon

This swimming-stroke looks like the Backcrawl where the starting position is on the back and the body rolls when the leg stroke begins. The arms are pulled over one at a time, just like with the back-crawl. The leg stroke is a scissor kick and starts when one of both arms is pulled over.


Water Stride, Stride Stroke

Inverted octopus, hands do not bend but move simultaneously with legs performing float kick, in a strong and rigid swings like those of water stride.


Turtle Stroke, Tortoise


On the breast, extend right arm then pull, after pushing with the left leg (while opposite limbs are recovering), then opposite limbs repeat this process, i. e. left arm pulls after right leg pushes. Uses muscles of the waist. Head can easily be above or below water: this is a slow but very sustainable stroke, common in turtles and newts.


Inverted Bat Stroke

Same as bat stroke, but on the breast.


Octopus stroke

The swimmer starts from floating posture backward spreading arms and feet in spread position, arms raised further up to the maximum momentum, keeping them parallel to the surface, in the propulsive phase returning the same way, hands to the body and legs merging. Legs opening to the 45 degree returning then returning and closing, arms smoothly from 90, 120 degrees of leg axis, then cling to the legs. More economical means of motion involves alternative movements of leg and arms, first arms then legs (Dalton, 1918). Effective swimming, however, implies their parallel movement.


Sepia bone


Sepia bone could be effective as drifting technique, in steering and floating in the fast flow, using only hand to navigate the stream, complementary as passive to more proactive swimming techniques


Eel Style


Start position of swimmer is backward, hands to body and legs close floating. Swimmer then starts to undulate first with hand and shoulders then trespassing undulation on legs. The propulsion force is mainly generated by hands, which stay all the time close to body. Swimmer tries to relay on gliding flow of water moving easily and swiftly. Legs do not perform flutter stroke as it will create force opposite to undulation. Efficiency is achieved by undulating along the whole body, intermittently and at intervals. Once the body is introduced in undulation, it will soon achieved optimal velocity. The purpose of transfer from preparation to propulsion phase is to generate gliding flow, which swimmer will use as additional lift in moving forward and up. Swimmers in nature use body undulations to generate these propulsive and maneuvering forces. The anguilliform kinematics is driven by muscular actions all along the body.


Mantle stroke, flying backstroke


Arms move like wings of raze ( or bird) elegantly folding in the elbow and wrists joints stretching from above the head to beneath the shoulder. Legs do perform float or flutter kick.


Bat stroke


Backstroke, hands parallel to surface moving from above the head to the hips. Legs perform butterfly kick at the finish of hands turn.

Literature

  • Cosmo, L. L. (2017). The Swimming Systems: Colchian and Sufi-ryu Suizyutsu plus Celtic swimming system technique [Kindle Edition]. Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Clias, P. H. (1823). An Elementary Course of Gymnastic Exercises: Intended to Develope and Improve the Physical Powers of Man. Sherwood, Jones and Company.
  • Dalton, F. E. (1918). Swimming scientifically taught. New York and London: Funk and Wagnalls Company
  • Davey, H. E. (2001). Japanese Yoga: The Way of Dynamic Meditation (Vol. 3). Stone Bridge Press, Inc.
  • Love, C. (2007). An overview of the development of swimming in England, c.1750-1918. International Journal of the History of Sport, 24, 568-585.
  • Orme, N. (1983). Early British Swimming, 55 BC-AD 1719: With the First Swimming Treatise in English, 1595. University of Exeter Press.
  • Mang, W. (1919). Schwimmsport. Leipzig : Verlag Hachmeister & Thal
  • Muths, J. C. F. G., & Klumpp, F. W. (1847). Gymnastik für die Jugend. Hoffmann.

References

  1. Cosmo, L. L. (2017). The Swimming Systems: Colchian and Sufi-ryu Suizyutsu plus Celtic swimming system technique. Amazon Media EU S.à r.l. (pp. 142-151). Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com
  2. Love, C. (2007). An overview of the development of swimming in England, c.1750-1918. International Journal of the History of Sport, 24, 568-585.
  3. Orme, N. (1983). Early British Swimming, 55 BC-AD 1719: With the First Swimming Treatise in English, 1595. University of Exeter Press.
  4. Mang, W. (1919). Schwimmsport. Leipzig : Verlag Hachmeister & Thal
  5. Clias, P. H. (1823). An Elementary Course of Gymnastic Exercises: Intended to Develope and Improve the Physical Powers of Man. Sherwood, Jones and Company.
  6. Dalton, F. E. (1918). Swimming scientifically taught. New York and London: Funk and Wagnalls Company