List of Disney's Lady and the Tramp characters

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This is a list of characters from the animated film Lady and the Tramp (1955) and its direct-to-video sequel Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure (2001).

Lady

Lady is an American Cocker Spaniel who lives in the house with her owners, Jim Dear and Darling. On the surface Lady possesses a classical canine personality: loving, good-spirited, and basically trusting. But although she is not quite as strong or forceful a character as Tramp, she is not without strength of her own. Romantic she may be, as well as frequently confused and terrified, but there is steel in her, as seen when she tells Tramp to go away following the unfortunate incident at the pound. An even greater degree of steel is shown as she struggles to break her chain in order to get at the rat that has infiltrated the baby's room (she is eventually successful). Of all the characters in the two films, Lady was one of those that changed the least between Lady and the Tramp and Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure. She is still the same loving, tender-hearted, quiet-spoken dog as always, and provides a lighter contrast to Tramp's sometimes-excessive discipline.

In contrast to the modern "blue for a boy, pink for a girl" color-coordination, Lady wears a blue collar, whereas Jock (and eventually Tramp) wear pinkish red ones. Since the film appears to take place around the turn of the century, this may be a nod to the older (until the 1920s) tradition that reserved sky blue for girls and pink (a "diminutive" form of the masculine red) for baby boys. Lady is voiced by Barbara Luddy in the first film; in the sequel, she is voiced by Jodi Benson.

Tramp

Tramp is a stray mutt who dreams of living with a family and having a home without being captured by dog-catchers and Lady's love interest. He has a knack for dodging dog-catchers and the ability to pick locks. He calls Lady "Pidge", short for Pigeon. It has been said that Tramp is not so much a dog who comes "not so much from the wrong side of the tracks as from sixty leagues beyond them" (as said in the Encyclopedia of Walt Disney’s Animated Characters by John Grant).

He has an altogether different view of people than what the housedogs in the film have. Whereas Lady, Jock, and Trusty view humans as being essentially faultless demigods, Tramp sees them as a flawed mixture of good and bad traits. He is also extremely wily and cocky, even to the point of being a con-artist as shown when he tricks a beaver into biting off Lady's muzzle. Although the so-called "log puller" does in fact end up working, it is only by dumb luck that it does so. Also, as is revealed to Lady (as well as the viewers) by a dog named Peg in the dog pound, Tramp has a history as something of a womanizer. Whereas Lady was apparently under the impression that she was Tramp's first and only true love, it is revealed that he had been going around, leaving a trail of broken hearts.

But, as it turns out, Tramp's feelings for Lady were stronger than any he had had for his previous girlfriends. Ultimately he chose to give up his "footloose and collar-free" lifestyle on the streets (and, as it turned out, the loyalty of his friend Buster) in exchange for a family life with Lady.

Over half a year later, when Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure was set, virtually every trace of Tramp's life on the streets was gone. His muscles were soft, his personality mellowed, and his overall tempo had slowed comparatively to a crawl. In contrast to the streetwise and constantly active persona shown in the first film, he had taken on a calm and quiet demeanor, save that his temper flared somewhat when his son Scamp insistently stated that he wished to be a street dog. But when Scamp took off for the streets, Tramp wasted no time in going after him. Even though his skills were somewhat rusty, when he took on Reggie in the dog pound he fought almost as well as in his prime. And, after nearly losing his son, he apparently realized just how harsh he had been and promised to lighten up.

Tramp was modeled on an actual stray dog found and adopted by a member of the Disney staff at the time the film was made. Two notable differences between the real dog and Tramp are that the real dog was still a puppy, and also a female. Tramp went through several names before the name "Tramp" was settled on. These included "Rags" and "Bozo". Tramp is voiced by Larry Roberts in the first film; in the sequel, he is voiced by Jeff Bennett.

Jock

Jock is a small but tough Scottish Terrier with the accent to prove it, and one of Lady's friends. Jock is a show dog with numerous trophies. During the first film, he and Trusty take an immediate dislike to Tramp, but at the end, they realize Tramp was protecting the baby and have a change of heart.

Jock possesses a slightly gruff personality, tempered by his essential good nature. He is clearly the brains of the duo, and frequently stops Trusty from repeating old epithets from his Grandfather, Old Reliable. At the same time Jock plays a main part in concealing an unfortunate fact from the bloodhound: he (Trusty) has lost his sense of smell. Although he is initially downright hostile to Tramp, Jock ultimately does his best to save Tramp from certain death in the pound once it was revealed Tramp was actually protecting the baby from a rat.

During the original film Jock gives his real name: Heather Lad o' Glencairn. Presumably he answers to the name Jock in order to please his owners, as well as Lady, whom he calls "Lassie". Since Lady of all the dogs in the film seems to be the most closely bonded to humans, it fits that she calls him "Jock".

In Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure, Jock is much the same as he was before: gruff but good-tempered, and frequently exasperated by Trusty. He appeared in Oliver & Company (1988) for a brief moment as one of the dogs watching Dodger perform the song "Why Should I Worry?". Jock also appears briefly in One Hundred and One Dalmatians (1961). After Danny the Great Dane and his terrier friend receive Pongo's message, Jock is the dog Danny passes the message on to and he in tune passes it on. Jock is voiced by Bill Thompson in the first film; in the sequel, he is voiced by Jeff Bennett.

Trusty

Trusty is an old bloodhound who used to track criminals with his Grandpappy, Old Reliable, until he lost his sense of smell. He is decidedly the lesser brain of the pair. He has lost his sense of smell, but no one lets on that they know. And since he has apparently convinced himself that he still can smell, he lives his life in blissful ignorance, remembering, as Jock says, "those bonnie bygone days when he and his grandfather (Old Reliable) were tracking criminals through the swamps."

Apparently Old Reliable was not only a first-rate tracker but also a source of wise bon mots, for Trusty's standard line is, "As my grandpappy, Old Reliable, used to say... don't recollect if I've ever mentioned Old Reliable before." However he has mentioned Old Reliable before, and quite frequently at that. When at last Trusty gets a chance to recall what it is Old Reliable used to say, he finally realizes that "I clean forgot what it was he used to say."

Trusty is generally a doleful character, but a noble and loyal one. Despite his initial mistrust of Tramp, he is more than ready to risk his life to save Tramp (his nose seems to work for once) and ultimately comes close to losing his life in the act. However, it has never been quite revealed for whether he did so for Tramp's sake or Lady's.

Little has changed about Trusty in Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure. His nose is still futile (or perhaps not quite so - the wig he tracked had been in contact with Scamp, and Scamp himself was at that very moment only just across the river), his memory is still largely dysfunctional, and he remains, overall, lovable but dumb as a post. Like Jock, he appeared in Oliver & Company for a brief moment as one of the dogs watching Dodger perform the song "Why Should I Worry?". Trusty is voiced by Bill Baucom in the first film; in the sequel, he is voiced by Jeff Bennett.

Si and Am

Si and Am are two twin Siamese cats with a knack for mischief and never-ending trouble, owned by Aunt Sarah. Si and Am are voiced by Peggy Lee in the first film; in the sequel, they are voiced by Mary Kay Bergman and Tress MacNeille.

Peg

Peg is a sassy stray female Lhasa Apso, whom Lady meets (along with the other dog inmates she was put in a cage with), when she is caught by the dog pound. It is implied that she had a relationship with Tramp in the past, through the lyrics of the song she sings (He's a Tramp). She was formerly from the Dog and Pony Follies (dog and pony show); either the shows ended or she was left behind. She speaks with a Brooklyn Accent. She was created for singer Peggy Lee and with her blonde bangs look to be a part of the film.[1] Peg did not appear in the sequel. Like Jock and Trusty, she appeared in Oliver & Company for a brief moment as one of the dogs watching Dodger perform the song "Why Should I Worry?". She also appeared in One Hundred and One Dalmatians as one of the dogs in the pet shop that were passing on the message about the stolen puppies.

Toughy

Toughy is a stray male mongrel from the dog pound. He speaks with a slight Brooklyn accent, similar to Peg. Toughy is voiced by Dallas McKennon in the first film; he did not appear in the sequel.

Boris

Boris is a stray male Borzoi; from the dog pound. He speaks with a Russian accent. Boris is voiced by Alan Reed in the first film; he did not appear in the sequel.

Pedro

Pedro is a stray male Chihuahua from the dog pound. He speaks with a Mexican accent. Pedro is voiced by Dallas McKennon in the first film; he did not appear in the sequel.

Bull

Bull is a stray male bulldog from the dog pound. He speaks with a slight Cockney-Australian accent. Like Peg, he appeared in One Hundred and One Dalmatians as one of the dogs in the pet shop that were passing on the message about the stolen puppies. Bull is voiced by Bill Thompson in the first film; he did not appear in the sequel.

Dachsie

Dachsie is a stray male dachshund at the dog pound. He speaks with a German accent. Dachsie is voiced by Bill Thompson in the first film; he did not appear in the sequel.

Jim Dear

Jim Dear is the fatherly human figure and Darling's husband. Jim Dear is voiced by Lee Millar in the first film; in the sequel, he is voiced by Nick Jameson.

Darling

Darling is the wife of Jim Dear and motherly human figure. Darling is voiced by Peggy Lee in the first film; in the sequel, she is voiced by Barbara Goodson.

Aunt Sarah

Aunt Sarah comes to take care of the baby when Jim Dear and Darling leave for a few days. Aunt Sarah is strict; she does not understand dogs and thinks they are trouble. Aunt Sarah also has a terrible, flat singing voice. Her rendition of "Rock-a-Bye Baby" is dire (Lady certainly thinks so, anyway). Aunt Sarah is voiced by Verna Felton in the first film; in the sequel, she is voiced by Tress MacNeille.

Tony

Tony is the owner and chef of Tony's, an Italian restaurant. Both Tony and Joe have great affection for Tramp. Tony is voiced by George Givot in the first film; in the sequel, he is voiced by Jim Cummings.

Joe

Joe is Tony's assistant chef. Joe is voiced by Bill Thompson in the first film; in the sequel, he is voiced by Michael Gough.

The rat

The rat is a potentially vicious rat which skulks around the neighborhood, and goes after the baby, but in the end, it gets killed by Tramp; therefore, it did not appear in the sequel.

The beaver

The beaver is a clever, hard-working beaver at the zoo, who speaks with a lisp and gnaws off the muzzle that Aunt Sarah had placed upon Lady. He shows himself a stereotypical engineer by calculating the increased efficiency for using the muzzle to tow down trees to the beaver dam. The beaver is voiced by Stan Freberg in the first film; he did not appear in the sequel.

Junkyard Dogs

The Junkyard Dogs are a mischievious pack of canines inhabiting the Junkyard of the town in which the sequel Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure is set.

Members

  • Buster is the leader of The Junkyard Dogs, and very full of himself. He has complete power over the Junkyard, and is deeply insistent on the idea that in the Junkyard "it's every dog for himself". As he puts it: "Buster's trouble is Buster's trouble". He seems to think in the first half of the film that Angel is his "girl", a position which it seems denotes ownership more than anything else. His delusion has no basis in reality. Angel frequently scowls and even once bares her teeth when Buster is talking. Buster hates housedogs. When he finds out that Scamp is Tramp's son, he uses Scamp for revenge against Tramp, first by turning the pup against Tramp and then by setting Scamp up so he gets caught by the dog-catcher. Buster is a large Doberman Pinscher. Ironically, considering his status as a house-dog-hater, Buster must have had an owner at some point, because he has both cropped ears and a docked tail, both done to a young Dobermann by the breeder or owner. Buster is voiced by Chazz Palminteri, and his singing voice was provided by Jess Harnell.
  • Angel is the youngest of the dogs, but nonetheless very streetwise. She is a member of the Junkyard Dogs for most of the film, but she quits as soon as she gets the chance (namely Scamp and his family). She is about Scamp's age, and starts off acting almost like a big sister towards him, though she falls for him in the second half of the film. She wants a family, but cannot find one. She has had families before, but they have abandoned her. She eventually finds a place in Scamp's family at the end of the film.

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She gets very annoyed when Buster calls her his "girl", but is tolerant enough not to bite him. Angel is of uncertain breeding (even whether she was born in a home or born stray is never revealed), resembling a Pomeranian. Angel is voiced by Alyssa Milano, and her singing voice was provided by Susan Egan.

  • Scamp, the feisty, rebellious son of Lady and Tramp, becomes a Junkyard Dog at one point. However, after realizing that Buster has other plans, he decides to go home. In terms of appearance, he is a younger version of Tramp. He is half American Cocker Spaniel (from Lady's side of the family). It does show a little bit because he is light colored, his ears are a little long, and he is skinny like Lady. Scamp is voiced by Scott Wolf, and his singing voice was provided by Roger Bart.
  • Tramp, "the best street dog there ever was", was once a Junkyard Dog, and used to be friends with Buster. Buster was very angry that Tramp abandoned him after falling in love with Lady.
  • Ruby is the only female Junkyard Dog besides Angel; she is often described as "amorous". Ruby is an Afghan hound and is voiced by Cathy Moriarty.
  • Scratchy is the brown one of the two old, scruffy dogs at the Junkyard. Scratchy is a mutt and is voiced by Dee Bradley Baker.
  • Sparky is the grey one of the two old, scruffy dogs at the Junkyard. He tells The Legend of the Tramp, a colorful but untrue tale involving Tramp jumping down a river to escape dog-catchers. Buster reveals the truth of how Tramp left the Junkyard Dogs; he ran off with Lady and became a house pet. Sparky is a mutt and is voiced by Mickey Rooney.
  • Mooch is the least intelligent of the pack, but still enthusiastic about the Junkyard Dogs. At the end of the film, it is shown that he and the other Junkyard Dogs have finally been adopted. Mooch is an Old English sheepdog and is voiced by Bill Fagerbakke.

References

  1. Lady and the Tramp Platinum Edition DVD disc 1 'Closed caption track, states the term dog and pony follies - 'which best links to subject dog and pony show'